Cognitive Therapy with Chronic Pain Patients

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Springer Publishing Company, Oct 7, 2003 - Medical - 376 pages
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This manual begins with an introduction to chronic, nonmalignant pain treatment and some of the main pain theories, as well as approaches to pain management . The core of the book delineates the application of Beck's cognitive therapy assessment and intervention strategies with this client population, and offers an easy-to-follow structured approach.

The book provides case examples and therapist-patient dialogues to demonstrate cognitive therapy in action and illustrate ways to improve collaborative efforts between practitioners and patients.

 

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Contents

III
1
IV
3
V
25
VI
43
VII
57
VIII
85
IX
87
X
102
XIX
229
XX
257
XXII
276
XXIII
293
XXIV
307
XXV
309
XXVI
327
XXVII
339

XI
123
XII
125
XIII
142
XIV
165
XV
183
XVII
208
XXVIII
341
XXIX
349
XXX
353
XXXI
363
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 356 - Do the effects of cognitive therapy endure?: A two-year follow-up of tension headache sufferers treated with cognitive therapy or biofeedback.
Page 360 - Stanton-Hicks, M., Baron, R., Boas, R., Gordh, T., Harden, N., Hendler, N., Koltzenberg, M., Raj., P., & Wilder, R.
Page 355 - Pain, negative mood, and perceived support in chronic pain patients: a daily diary study of people with reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome.
Page 361 - Self-regulation of chronic arthritic pain and long-term analgesic dependence in a hemophiliac. Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, in press.
Page 353 - RD (1996). Explaining high rates of depression in chronic pain: A diathesis-stress framework. Psychological Bulletin, 119, 95110.
Page 360 - Effect of EMG biofeedback compared to applied relaxation training with chronic, upper extremity cumulative trauma disorders. Pain, 63, 199-206.
Page 353 - DR (1998). Effects of autogenic relaxation training on electromyographic activity in active myofascial trigger points. Journal of Musculoskeletal Pain, 6.

References to this book

About the author (2003)

A native of Rhode Island, Aaron Beck had an early interest in psychology. After graduating from Brown University, he embarked on a career in medicine at Yale University with the intention of specializing in psychiatry. Dissatisfied with classical psychoanalysis, he turned to modified psychoanalytic approaches and was particularly influenced by ego psychology advanced by Rapaport. Ego psychology directed his interest in cognition, and over time Beck abandoned the psychoanalytic framework and formulated his own cognitive theory-behavior therapy for patients with depression and other psychiatric disorders. He developed numerous measurement scales, including the Beck Depression Inventory, the Beck Hopelessness Scale, and the Self-Concept Test, which are widely used as diagnostic and research tools in the field. Beck continues to teach, consult, and write about the use of cognitive therapy in treating emotional disorders and other problems.

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