Cognitive Linguistics

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 22, 2004 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 356 pages
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Cognitive Linguistics argues that language is governed by general cognitive principles, rather than by a special-purpose language module. This introductory textbook surveys the field of cognitive linguistics as a distinct area of study, presenting its theoretical foundations and the arguments supporting it. Clearly organised and accessibly written, it provides a useful introduction to the relationship between language and cognitive processing in the human brain. It covers the main topics likely to be encountered in a course or seminar, and provides a synthesis of study and research in this fast-growing field of linguistics. The authors begin by explaining the conceptual structures and cognitive processes governing linguistic representation and behaviour, and go on to explore cognitive approaches to lexical semantics, as well as syntactic representation and analysis, focusing on the closely related frameworks of cognitive grammar and construction grammar. This much-needed introduction will be welcomed by students in linguistics and cognitive science.
 

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Contents

Introduction what is cognitive linguistics?
1
Frames domains spaces the organization of conceptual structure
7
profileframe organization
14
23 Some consequences of the profileframedomain distinction
16
24 Extensions of the basic profileframedomain distinction
22
242 Scope of predication
23
243 Relationships between domains
24
25 Domains and idealized cognitive models
28
614 Taxonymy
147
62 Lexical aspects of the partwhole relation
150
621 The partwhole relation
151
622 Meronymy
159
A dynamic construal approach to sense relations II antonymy and complementarity
164
712 Main varieties of opposite
165
713 Goodnessofexemplar in opposites
166
72 Complementarity
167

26 Mental spaces
32
Conceptualization and construal operations
40
32 Attentionsalience
46
321 Selection
47
322 Scope of attention dominion
50
323 Scalar adjustment
51
324 Dynamic attention
53
33 Judgementcomparison
54
332 Metaphor
55
333 Figureground alignment
56
34 Perspectivesituated ness
58
341 Viewpoint
59
343 Subjectivity
62
35 ConstitutionGestalt
63
352 Force dynamics
66
353 Relationality entityinterconnection
67
36 Conclusion
69
Categories concepts and meanings
74
42 The classical model of category structure
76
43 The prototype model of category structure
77
432 The representation of conceptual categories
81
433 Levels of categorization
82
434 Shortcomings of prototype theory
87
435 The framebased account of prototype effects
91
44 A dynamic construal approach to conceptual categories
92
441 Category boundaries
93
442 Frames
95
443 Levels of categorization
96
45 The dynamic construal of meaning
97
451 Contextualized interpretation
98
452 Purport
100
453 Constraints
101
454 Construal
103
46 Structural and logical aspects of meaning
104
Concluding remarks
105
Polysemy the construal of sense boundaries
109
52 Full sense boundaries
110
521 Homonymy and polysemy
111
523 Boundary effects
112
524 The nature of full sense units
115
53 Subsense units with nearsense properties
116
532 Microsenses
126
533 Waysofseeing
137
534 Semantic components and lowautonomy active zones
138
535 Contextual modulation
140
A dynamic construal approach to sense relations I hyponymy and meronymy
141
612 Hyponymy and context
143
615 Relations between lexical items
146
73 Antonymy
169
polar antonyms
173
733 Biscalar systems
181
74 Variable construal of antonyms and complementaries
185
742 Scale features
189
75 Conclusion
192
Metaphor
193
82 The conceptual theory of metaphor
194
822 Issues in the conceptual theory of metaphor
198
83 Novel metaphor
204
832 How do we recognize metaphors?
206
833 Blending Theory and novel metaphors
207
834 Context sensitivity
209
835 Asymmetry of vehicle and target
210
84 Metaphor and simile
211
843 Metaphorsimile combinations
215
85 Metaphor and metonymy
216
852 Metaphormetonymy relations
217
853 Types of indeterminacy
219
86 Conclusion
220
From idioms to construction grammar
225
92 The problem of idioms
229
93 Idioms as constructions
236
94 From constructions to construction grammar
247
An overview of construction grammars
257
1012 The organization of constructional knowledge
262
102 Some current theories of construction grammar
265
102 7 Construction Grammar Fillmore Kay et al
266
1022 Lakoff 1987 and Goldberg 1995
272
1023 Cognitive Grammar as a construction grammar
278
1024 Radical Construction Grammar
283
103 Conclusion
290
The usagebased model
291
112 The usagebased model in morphology
292
1122 Regularity productivity and default status
295
1123 Productoriented schemas
300
1124 Network organization of word forms
302
1125 Conclusion
307
113 The usagebased model in syntax
308
1132 Productoriented syntactic schemas
313
1133 Relevance and the organization of construction networks
318
1134 The acquisition of syntax and syntactic change
323
114 Conclusion
326
Conclusion cognitive linguistics and beyond
328
References
330
Author index
344
Subject index
347
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About the author (2004)

D. Alan Cruse is Senior Lecturer in the School of English and Linguistics, University of Manchester.

William Croft is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Manchester.

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