Cognitive Processes in Eye Guidance

Front Cover
Geoffrey D. M. Underwood
Oxford University Press, 2005 - Medical - 386 pages
Whether reading, looking at a picture, or driving, how is it that we know where to look next - how does the human visual system calculate where our gaze should be directed in order to achieve our cognitive aims? Of course, there is an interaction between the decisions about where we shouldlook and about how long we should look there. However, our eyes do not just move randomly over the visual field - whether we are reading, driving, or solving a problem. There are systematic variations not only in the duration of each eye fixation, but also in what we are looking at. It is thesevariations in eye movements that can tell us much about the cognitive processes involved in the performance of these activities. Within reading research, great progress has already been made in understanding these processes and there are now a number of competing and well-formed models. In someother areas of perception, the development of formal theories and the search for critical evidence is less advanced. This book brings together leading vision scientists studying eye movements across a range of activities, such as reading, driving, computer activities, and chess. It providesgroundbreaking new research that will help us understand how it is that we know where to move our eyes, and thereby better understand the cognitive processes underlying these activities.

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Contents

Sources of information for the programming of short
33
Implications for theories of eye movement
53
An overview
79
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Geoffrey Underwood is a Professor of Cognitive Psychology at the University of Nottingham.

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