Cognitive Therapy: 100 Key Points and Techniques

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Psychology Press, 2004 - Psychology - 267 pages
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Cognitive Therapy: 100 Key Points and Techniques is a crisp, concise elaboration of the 100 main features of the most popular and best validated approach within the field of cognitive behaviour therapy. The 100 key points cover cognitive therapy theory and practice, and examine misconceptions about this approach. Divided into helpful sections, topics covered include assessment, homework, ways of detecting NATS, uncovering core beliefs and relapse prevention.

This neat, usable book is an essential guide for psychotherapists and counsellors, both in training and in practice, who need to ensure they are entirely familiar with the key features of cognitive behavioural therapy.
 

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Excellent presentation and found it another helpful tool. C Balfour, Spokane WA

Contents

Information processing becomes distorted when
5
Emotional reactions to events are viewed along
11
Our thoughts and beliefs are both knowable
17
MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT CT
25
Only articulate and intelligent clients can really benefit from CT
27
CT does not focus on feelings
29
CT is basically positive thinking
31
CT seems too simple
33
Reattribution
127
Decatastrophizing
129
Exploring double standards
131
Modifying imagery
133
Behavioural experiments
135
Socratic questioning guided discovery
137
Exaggeration and humour
141
Writing down alternative responses to NATS
143

CT is little more than symptom relief
35
CT is not interested in the clients past or childhood experiences
37
CT does not make use of the relationship as a means of client change
39
CT is not interested in the social and environmental factors that contribute to clients problems
41
CT is just the application of common sense to clients problems
43
CT teaches clients to think rationally in tackling their problems
45
Part3 CT PRACTICE
47
Getting started
49
Setting the scene
51
Undertaking an assessment
53
Assessing client suitability for CT
55
Structuring the therapy session
59
Setting the agenda
61
Drawing up a problem list
63
Agreeing on goals
65
Teaching the cognitive model
67
Developing a case conceptualization
69
Developing treatment plans
73
Ways of detecting NATS
75
Detecting NATS
77
Guided discovery
79
Using imagery
81
Making suggestions
83
Insession emotional changes
85
Finding the thoughts by ascertaining the clients idiosyncratic meaning of the event
87
Focusing on feelings
89
Assuming the worst
91
In vivo exposure
93
Role play
95
Analysing a specific situation
97
NATS in shorthand
99
Symptom induction
101
Behavioural assignments
103
Eliciting NATS from less important cognitive data
105
Separating situations thoughts and feelings
107
Distinguishing between thoughts and feelings
109
Examining and responding to NATS
111
Answering back
113
Weighing the evidence
115
Constructing alternative explanations
119
Identifying cognitive distortions
121
Looking at the advantages and disadvantages
123
Defining terms
125
Homework
145
Rationale for homework
147
Types of homework assignment
149
Negotiating homework assignments
153
Reviewing homework assignments
155
Ways of identifying underlying assumptions and rules
159
Revealing if then statements
161
Spotting musts and shoulds
163
Discerning themes in clientsautomatic thoughts
165
Investigating marked mood variations
167
The downward arrow
169
Memories family sayings mottoes
171
Revising assumptions and rules
173
Behavioural experiments
175
Disobeying theshouldsandmusts
177
Redrawing personal contracts
179
Examining the short and longterm usefulness of assumptions and rules
181
Developing an alternative assumption that retains the advantages of the maladaptive assumption and jettisons its disadvantages
183
Listing the advantages and disadvantages of a rule or assumption
185
Exploring the historical development of assumptions and rules
187
Using imagery to modify assumptions
189
Uncovering core beliefs
191
The downward arrow
193
Conjunctive phrasing
195
Sentence completion
197
Core beliefs appearing as automatic thoughts
199
Developing and strengthening newexisting core beliefs
201
Educating clients about core beliefs
203
Developing alternative core beliefs
205
Use of a continuum
207
Positive data logs
209
Actingas if
211
Historical test of the new core belief
213
Challenging each thought in the downward arrow procedure
215
Rationalemotional role play
217
Learning selfacceptance
219
Client resistance
225
Relapse prevention
235
Maintaining gains from therapy
241
Practising what you preach
249
References
259
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About the author (2004)

Michael Neenan is Associate Director of the Centre for Stress Management, London.

Windy Dryden is Professor of Psychotherapeutic Studies at Goldsmiths College, London.

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