Cold War Casualty: The Court-martial of Major General Robert W. Grow

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Kent State University Press, 1993 - History - 251 pages
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New research data gathered through the Freedom of Information Act and the first use of the Grow files provide the framework for this absorbing account of the general court-martial of one of General George S. Patton's famous armored division commanders of World War II.
The 1952 court-martial of Major General Robert W. Grow, senior U.S. military attache in Moscow during the Korean War era, involved a general officer who had used questionable judgment in recording impolitic statements in his personal diary, portions of which had been photocopied by an alleged Soviet agent in Frankfurt, West Germany. This era of Cold War tensions and McCarthyism, Western media sensationalism, and communist propaganda created a cause celebre and influenced the Army Staff in the Pentagon, led by Lieutenant General Maxwell D. Taylor, to exercise controversial command influence under the aegis of the new Uniform Code of Military Justice.
While the State Department and Central Intelligence Agency recommended refuting the implications of the published diary the Army Staff decided to prosecute the unfortunate attache. Grow, a career soldier, welcomed a formal hearing in order to clear his name. The result became an exercise in army politics and an example of the corruption of the military justice system through managerial careerism and unlawful command influence.
Through his analysis of the Grow incident, Hofmann traces the actual operation of military judicial process under the Uniform Code and examines the bureaucratic intrigues, influence of the media, Cold War propaganda, and resulting conflict between service and self-interest.
 

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Cold War casualty: the court-martial of Major General Robert W. Grow

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Grow's court-martial, a vibrant cause celebre in 1952, is yet another relic of the Cold War that is fast becoming forgotten. Grow was a military attache in Moscow who had the misfortune of having his ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
The Man the Times and the Cold War
7
The Book and the Diary
21
Media Reaction
40
The Victory Guest House
62
Command Influence
92
Pretrial Investigation
116
The General CourtMartial
140
CONCLUSION
172
NOTES
198
ESSAY ON SOURCES
222
INDEX
244
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