Cold War Fighters: Canadian Aircraft Procurement, 1945-54

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UBC Press, Nov 3, 2011 - History - 208 pages
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The cancellation of the CF-105 Arrow in 1959 holds such a grip on the imagination of Canadians that earlier developments in defence procurement remain in the shadows.

Randall Wakelam corrects this oversight and offers fresh insight into the AVRO saga and contemporary procurement issues by detailing the complexities Canada's air force faced in buying fighter aircraft and by showing how the RCAF grew by leaps and bounds. Wakelam shows that cabinet members, chiefs of staff, and air marshals were forced to negotiate competing pressures to arm the air force, please allies, and save money. Their decisions resulted in the CF-100 Canuck and the F-86 Sabre, Canada's front-line defensive aircraft in the coldest years of the Cold War. Although historians assume that the Arrow arrived on the heels of these successes, Wakelam reveals that neither the air force nor the government believed AVRO could manufacture even the CF-100 on budget.

 

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Contents

1 An AirMinded Middle Power
1
2 Planning for Peace
19
3 International and Industrial Alliances
34
4 Caught FlatFooted
44
5 Facing the Threat in Earnest
63
6 And So to War
81
7 Juggling Numbers
105
8 Putting Rubber on the Ramp
118
9 Growing Needs Growing Concerns
129
10 Fact and Fancy
142
Appendix A Royal Canadian Air Force Headquarters Organization Chart c 1947
148
Appendix B Department of Defence Production Aircraft Delivery Statistics 195154
149
Notes
154
Bibliography
175
Index
180
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About the author (2011)

Colonel (ret'd) Randall Wakelam teaches military history and leadership at the Royal Military College of Canada and is author of The Science of Bombing: Operational Research in RAF Bomber Command. A pilot in his service career, he also worked in aircraft procurement.

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