Cold War Soldier: Life on the Front Lines of the Cold War

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Dundurn, Sep 14, 2011 - Biography & Autobiography - 182 pages
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The danger of participating in live-fire exercises and a Christmas spent in a military prison are described in detail in this graphic picture of military life at the height of the Cold War.

"From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an ’iron curtain’ has descended across the continent."

These words, uttered by Winston Churchill in 1946, heralded the beginning of the Cold War. In this first-hand account of a NATO soldier, Terry Stoney Burke paints a graphic picture of military life at the height of the Cold War. From the trials and tribulations of basic training, through his progress of becoming an infantryman and explosive specialist, to his posting in Germany, his pull no punches narrative tells the sometimes humorous, often poignant, story of life as a common soldier.

Cold War Soldieris not a book for veterans alone. Burkes explanations of military procedures, weapons, and army life strike a happy balance between reminding ex-servicemen of things they knew but may have forgotten, and creating a clear picture for the military novice.

 

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Contents

Prelude to a Life
9
Sheep Shit and Cherry Stones
19
House Mouse or Shack Rat
35
Of Mice and Men
49
The Perils of Peanut Butter and Jam
59
Is There Any Such Thing as a Dumb Question?
73
Soaring with the Eagles in Sennelager
81
The Happy Gang
101
My Home in Amsterdam
129
Merry Christmas Quick March
139
Dating in Sign Language
157
Good Luck or Good Leadership?
167
A House Is Not a Home
179
Of Related Interest
183
BACK COVER
185
Copyright

And Miles to Go Before We Sleep
113

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About the author (2011)

Terry Burke joined the Canadian army in 1964 and was posted to Germany with The Royal Canadian Regiment. He has done nine U.N. tours of duty in Cyprus, Lebanon, Israel, and Syria, and was active in Ottawa-Hull during the FLQ crisis. Burke retired to London, Ontario, with his wife, whom he met during his first tour of Germany.

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