Collaborative Intelligence: Using Teams to Solve Hard Problems

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Berrett-Koehler Publishers, May 12, 2011 - Business & Economics - 240 pages
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Intelligence professionals are commonly viewed as solo operators. But these days intelligence work is mostly about collaboration. Interdisciplinary and even inter-organizational teams are necessary to solve the really hard problems intelligence professionals face. Tragically, these teams often devolve into wheel-spinning, contentious assemblies that get nothing done. Or members may disengage from a team if they find its work frustrating, trivial, or a waste of their time. Even teams with a spirit of camaraderie may take actions that are flat-out wrong. But there is also good news. This book draws on recent research findings as well as Harvard Professor Richard Hackman’s own experience as an intelligence community researcher and advisor to show how leaders can create an environment where teamwork flourishes. Hackman identifies six enabling conditions – such as establishing clear norms of conduct and providing well-timed team coaching – that increase the likelihood that teams will be effective in any setting or type of organization.. Although written explicitly for intelligence, defense, crisis management, and law enforcement professionals it will also be valuable for improving team success in all kinds of leadership, management, service, and production teams in business, government, and nonprofit enterprises.
 

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Contents

The Challenge and Potential of Teams
1
Teams in Intelligence
7
The Six Enabling Conditions
51
Implications for Leaders and Organizations
149
Notes
185
References
199
Index
213
About the Author
219
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About the author (2011)

J. RICHARD HACKMAN is Cahners-Rabb Professor of Social and Organizational Psychology at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Illinois in 1966, and taught at Yale University until 1986. He is coauthor of several books, including Work Redesign (1980).

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