Collage Lab: Experiments, Investigations, and Exploratory Projects

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Quarry Books, Feb 1, 2010 - Crafts & Hobbies - 144 pages
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Collage Lab offers artists and crafters a fun and experimental approach to making art. The book is organized into 52 different labs which may, but don't need to be, explored on a weekly basis. The labs can be worked in any order, so that readers can flip around to learn a new mixed-media technique or be inspired by a particular collage theme or application. The underlying message of this book is that artists can and should learn and gain expertise through experimentation and play. There is no right or wrong result for a given exercise, yet readers will gain skills and confidence in collage techniques, allowing them to take their work to a new level.
 
Collage Lab is illustrated with brilliant full-color images and multiple examples of each exercise, offers a visual, non-linear approach to learning art techniques, and reinforces a fun and fearless approach to making art.

 

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Contents

Overview
8
UNIT 1 Building the Foundation
10
UNIT 2 Texture
20
UNIT 3 Gesso
30
UNIT 4 Color
40
UNIT 5 Surface Design
50
UNIT 6 Line and Form
62
UNIT 7 Papers
72
UNIT 9 Mediums
94
UNIT 10 Imagery
106
UNIT 11 Visual Dictionary
118
UNIT 12 Unification and Composition
128
Gallery
138
Contributors
142
About the Author
143
Acknowledgments
144

UNIT 8 Paper Play
84

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About the author (2010)

Bee Shay is a print maker, collage and mixed media artist, and longtime instructor. She has contributed to magazines, including the Artistic Stenciler and Somerset Studio.  Her work has also been featured in several Quarry Books including: True Vision, Collaborative Art Journals and Shared Adventures in Mixed Media, The Creative Entrepreneur, and Re-Bound.  Bee lives with her husband in the Philadelphia area and is mother of three beautiful souls. When she’s not inciting the muse in her students or working in her barn studio she lovingly calls her nest, she can be found roaming outside seeking the wonders of the natural world for inspiration.

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