Collection Management for Youth: Responding to the Needs of Learners

Front Cover
American Library Association, 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 103 pages
0 Reviews
Effective collection management is no longer just about having the best collection. As education shifts to a learner-centered environment, collection development must address the dynamic interplay between all stakeholders in the wider school community. Drawing from the latest educational theory and research, Hughes-Hassell and Mancall recommend a plan to build and maintain a solid collection in the midst of radical flux, while meeting students' information needs in a holistic context. Connecting to the guidelines of Information Power, the premier learner-focused model for library media centers, Collection Management for Youth is grounded in educational theory to help relate the whys with the hows. The authors pose a challenge to school library media specialists and supervisors, youth librarians in public libraries, and educators: Given these tools, are you willing to become learner-centered collection managers, to wear the hats of change agents, leaders, learners, and research guides? collections that meet the changing needs of learners; Address a dynamic educational process and ever-changing resource base; Become an informed teacher and information guide; Tap into the school's broadest learning community to build partnerships; Addressing both real and virtual information sources, this must-have manual is filled with eleven field-tested tools to encourage collaboration and help put the concepts to work.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Theoretical Foundation for LearnerCentered Collection Management
1
Changing Expectations and Models for Practice
3
The Proliferating Body and Nature of Information
5
Evolving Models of Collection Management
6
Collector Behaviors
11
Change Agent
13
Strategies for LearnerCentered Collection Management
17
Policy as the Foundation for the Collection
19
Collaboration from a Planning Perspective
66
What Makes Collaboration Work?
67
What Are Communities of Practice?
68
What Format of Plans Will Be Most Persuasive?
69
Tools for LearnerCentered Collection Management
77
Stakeholder ContactSWOT Analysis
79
Identifying Resources in Your Community
81
Identifying Learner Characteristics
83

LearnerCentered Elements of Policy
20
The Collaborative Planning Process
22
Selecting Resources for Learning
33
Understanding the Context
35
Understanding the World of Resources
43
Understanding the Resources in the Community
48
Budgeting for Maximum Impact on Learning
52
Sources of Income
53
Basic Budget Models
54
A Budget Model for a LearnerCentered Environment
57
Emerging Considerations
64
Preparing a Strategic LearnerCentered Vision and Collection Goals
85
LearnerCentered Policy Critique
87
DecisionMaking Model for Selecting Resources and Access Points That Support Learning
89
Matrix for Gathering Data about the Curriculum
91
Collection Development Analysis Worksheet
93
Identifying Funding Sources in Your Community
95
BudgetJustification Plan
97
Checklist for Planning LCCD Promotional Efforts
99
Index
101
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2005)

Jacqueline C. Mancall is a professor in the College of Information Science and Technology at Drexel University.

Bibliographic information