Collections of the New York Historical Society for the Year ...

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Page 357 - And further, full power and authority are hereby given and granted to the said General Court from time to time to make, ordain, and establish, all manner of wholesome and reasonable orders, laws, statutes and ordinances...
Page 370 - Name of the Council Established at Plymouth in the County of Devon, for the Planting, Ruling, Ordering and Governing of New England in America...
Page 195 - The supreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own consent. For the preservation of property being the end of government, and that for which men enter into society, it necessarily supposes and requires that the people should have property...
Page 319 - GEORGE the second by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith &c.
Page 521 - All that part of the main land of New England beginning at a certain place called or known by the name of St. Croix next adjoining to New Scotland in America...
Page 356 - ... given and granted full power and authority from time to time to administer oaths or affirmations, for the better discovery of truth in any matter in controversy or depending before them.
Page 357 - ... constitution, as they shall judge to be for the good and welfare of this Commonwealth, and for the government and ordering thereof, and of the subjects of the same, and for the necessary support and defence of the government thereof...
Page 318 - Usage to the contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding. And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That...
Page 357 - Commonwealth, and the forms of such oaths or affirmations, as shall be respectively administered unto them, for the execution of their several offices and places, so as the same be not repugnant or contrary to this Constitution...
Page 195 - ... supposed to lose that by entering into society which was the end for which they entered into it, too gross an absurdity for any man to own. Men therefore in society having property, they have such a right to the goods which by the law of the community are theirs, that nobody hath a right to take their substance, or any part of it, from them without their own consent; without this they have no property at all.

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