Collective Decisions and Voting: The Potential for Public Choice

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Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2006 - Political Science - 335 pages
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Voting is often the most public and visible example of mass collective decision-making. But how do we define a collective decision? And how do we classify and evaluate the modes by which collective decisions are made? This book examines these crucial ques
 

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Contents

Defining a Collective Decision
3
A Taxonomy of Collective Decision Procedures
9
Economic Criteria for Evaluating Collective Decisions
23
General Criteria for Evaluating Collective Decision Procedures
35
Relative Advantages of Modes of Making Collective Decisions
43
What is a Good Collective Decision?
57
Voting
75
An Overview of Voting
77
The Arrow Theorem
123
Strategic Voting and the GibbardSatterthwaite Theorem
143
Criteria for Evaluating RankingBased VoteProcessing Rules
149
Alternatives to Plurality
165
minimal strategies under approval voting for 87 elections
173
minimal strategies under the Copeland rule for 87 elections
209
Vote Processing Rules for Selecting One Option from a Continuum of One or More Dimensions When Votes Have Predetermined Weights
245
Vote Processing Rules for Selecting More than One Candidate When Votes
263

Majority Rule and its Weighted Analog
83
Voting Cycles
93
of relative distance from the center of a diagonal
106
Vote Processing Rules With Endogenous Weights for Selfinterested
289
Lessons from the Excursion
321
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About the author (2006)

Nicolaus Tideman is Professor of Economics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. He has been there since 1973, as a post-doctoral fellow, Associate Professor, and Professor since 1985. He has published many professional articles, primarily in the areas of urban economics, public finance, efficient public decision-making, and economic justice.

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