College Matters Guide to Getting Into the Elite College of Your Dreams

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McGraw Hill Professional, Aug 21, 2004 - Reference - 271 pages
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An invaluable resource for high school students who dream of getting into top- flight colleges

College Matters offers the guidance of 12 students who made it into their dream colleges. They share their expertise about the entire process, from first explorations, to estimating chances, through the practical work of reaching the goal. Here's what you need to know to optimize your chances of admission to one of the most selective colleges.

Features include:

  • Proven techniques for getting into an elite college
  • An approach that teenagers can identify with
  • Chapters that are written by students uniquely qualified in specific topics--for example, Evelyn Huang, author of the financial aid chapter, won more than $110,000 in scholarships
 

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Contents

High School Courses
1
High School Activities
17
Why Bother?
38
Researching Colleges
43
Standardized Tests
58
The Application
86
The Story of an Application
100
College Application Essays
104
Advice for Parents
180
Scholarships and Financial Aid
188
Tips for College
207
StudentAthletes
210
Minorities
221
Conclusion
235
Sample Application Timeline
237
College Matters Scholarship Information
243

Recommendations
127
Admissions and Scholarship Interviews
137
College Visits
151
Choosing the Best College for You
165
College Matters CM Team Information
249
Index
255
About the Authors
267
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Jacquelyn Kung founded College Matters while she was a student at Harvard. She graduated in 2002 and works at the Boston Consulting Group.

Melissa Dell was the College Matters seminar director and will be the organization's 2004-2005 managing director. She is currently a Harvard junior studying abroad in Chile.

Joanna Chen graduated at the top of her class of 1,100, won a Presidential Scholarship, and was accepted early by Harvard and other top schools.

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