"Collegers V. Oppidans": A Reminiscence of Eton Life

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R. I. Drake, 1884 - 84 pages
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Page 15 - I waited a week he wouldn't be greenable," answered Jickling, coolly ; and saying this, he turned one of the pockets of his trousers inside out, and proceeded to remove a piece of Everton toffee that was sticking in a corner thereof. " New fellows," added he, sucking the toffee, " are like puppies — they begin to see clear towards the ninth day." " Don't mind what he says, Rivers," exclaimed young Greegleby, loftily. " Nobody pays any attention to him." " No, nobody," assented Blazepole, who had...
Page 70 - Etonians with him had pleaded for us, appealing to him to renounce his pursuit, in consideration of the gallant struggle we were making. But the very gallantry of the struggle seemed to Mr. Jones the most cogent reason for bringing us to punishment. He proclaimed his determination as he mopped his brow with his yellow silk handkerchief, and brushed what remained of mud and dust off his pantaloons, not to give us up on any account ; and he kept his word : for, as Jickling and I were pelting along...
Page 18 - ... flowered tablecloth, and like the chairs, carved to any lengths, if you were only prying enough to lift up a corner of the tablecloth and see. But all these items played only a subsidiary part in the adornment of the chamber, for it is not to his tutor that an Eton boy looks to make his room cozy. From the day when he is installed in the small apartment, which is his to do with as he pleases (blessed privilege !), the boy's one thought is how to give it that habitable look which smells of home...
Page 84 - He had not re-appeared by teatime ; and as it so happened that I desired to see him that evening about something or other, I went to his room, and opened the door. The hinges did not creak, so that he did not hear me nor look up. He was seated at his table, with his head buried in his arms, and he was sobbing as if his heart would break. ****** If you ask nowadays of any old Etonian who Jickling was, he will probably answer you : " Jickling ? Do you mean the fellow who was Newcastle Scholar and in...
Page 47 - Plantagenet," would answer threefoot-six, raising the lid of the basket, and thrusting his head in. " Oh, the Earl of Plantagenet. Yes, my lord ; many's the apple I've sold to his Grace your father ; but he chiefly liked tarts, did his Grace. Help yourself, my lord. I never takes ready money of a nobleman, my lord. Not that they often offers it me — they don't ; but it would be all the same if they did, my lord.
Page 23 - Stumpes deftly removed with a knife, as if used to such work. The muffins came last, but were advantageously planted beside the tea-pot, along with a hot-water contrivance that had been employed to keep them from cooling. Then Stumpes, having cast a searching glance to assure himself that there was nothing wanting, he and Blazepole were seized with a violent fit of coughing, which would have effectually precluded all further work on Asheton's part, had he not understood the hint, and risen. It was...
Page 31 - Yes," answered Jickling, in huge indignation ; " he's always fond of jawing. What business has he to question me about my ticks ? they don't concern him. And why does he say he shall spy and pry into me all this half ? He hasn't the right to do it. No, he hasn't. And it's hateful snobbishness of him to pretend he has.
Page 34 - ... everybody did just the amount of study that was absolutely and barely necessary to keep him out of trouble, but no more. And what this bare amount was may be pleasantly judged by the fact that even when a boy had reached to such a position in the school as Asheton occupied, he still learned all his lessons by the aid of the Bohn classics, feeling quite powerless to master them otherwise. I mention this to explain how it was that I found I had a good deal of spare time on my hands as soon as I...
Page 81 - ... performing prodigies of valour in the Oppidan cause, but to no purpose. Five minutes yet remained before the game finished ; and the conclusion seemed foregone. Jickling, who had been watching the game with a curious, silent interest, said with a short laugh (but rather softly as I thought), " Asheton's played well, but he won't win." Did Asheton hear him ? Did some secret voice, I mean, whisper to him that some such words as these were passing Jickling's lips. Anyhow, he glanced towards us,...
Page 79 - November, was the great event of the football season. At the time of which I am writing it was not usual for the Oppidans to win every year, as has later been the case. The match was played "at the wall," a peculiar sort of football, which the Foundation boys practised more than the Oppidans, or Town boys, and as a result the College team (although the Collegers had only seventy boys to choose from as against nearly six hundred on the other side) was extremely powerful and difficult to beat. On the...

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