Collegiate Fitness

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Campus Fitness, 2003 - Self-Help - 160 pages
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Despite the common perception of a "fitness craze," the truth is that many college students are not happy with their fitness and appearance. In this time of intellectual and personal exploration, students are finding out that their bodies are being neglected.
 

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Contents

The Core Fitness Values
1
Value OneSelfRespect
5
Value TwoAmusement
7
Value ThreeHealth
11
Value FourBalance
15
Value FiveSelfRenewal
17
The First Step to a Lifetime of Fitness Obtain Knowledge
19
Step TwoSet Realistic Goals
23
Designing an Aerobic Program
81
Running
87
Cycling
93
Swimming
97
Aerobic Machines
99
Flexibility Training
103
Flexibility TrainingAnatomy and Physiology
107
Flexibility TrainingMethods of Stretching
111

Step ThreeMake it Easy
27
Step FourBe Tenacious
31
Step FiveSeek Success
35
Strength TrainingOverview
39
Strength TrainingBasic Physiology
43
Muscle Fibers
49
Strength TrainingFundamental Principles
53
Implementing a Strength Training Plan The First Few Workouts
57
Monitoring Your Progress
63
General Strength Training Tips
65
Strength Training Etiquette
67
Strength Training and Appearance
69
Aerobic Training
71
The Benefits of Aerobic Training
73
Aerobic Training Terminology
75
Stretching Technique
115
Stretching Injury Prevention and Back Pain
119
Flexibility Tips
121
Nutrition 101
123
Metabolism
125
The Six Nutrients Proteins
127
Practical Solutions to Common Nutrition Problems
133
Ten Energy Rich Foods for Life on the Run
137
Ten Easy Ways to Improve Your Nutrition
139
Supplements
141
Creatine
147
Sports Nutrition
151
Fitness Appearance and Sexuality
155
Remember Whats Important
159
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

John Furia, M.D. is a board certified orthopedic surgeon, fellowship trained in sports medicine, and the Director of Sports Medicine at Evangelical Community Hospital. He is the orthopedic consultant to Bucknell University and has extensive experience formulating fitness programs for college students. Furia was born in Providence, R. I., graduated from Brown University, and received his MD degree from Vanderbilt University. He served as a surgical intern at St. Lukes/Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City and then moved to Rochester, N.Y to complete his orthopedic training at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Furia devoted one additional year to his formal education by working as a sports medicine fellow in the Baylor College of Medicine system in Houston, Texas. In Houston he had the opportunity to work closely with the professional athletes, team physicians, athletic trainers, and exercise specialists for the Houston Oilers, Houston Rockets, Houston Astros, and Houston Hot Shots. The author has extensive writing experience. He has published numerous scientific articles and book chapters that have appeared in peer-reviewed journals and books such as The American Journal of Sports Medicine, The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Orthopedics, The Journal of Arthoplasty, Orthopedic Secrets, and The Journal of Pediatrics. He has also authored numerous fitness articles for The Daily Item newspaper, Mens Health Online, and Medscape Orthopedics Online. John Furia has spoken on orthopedic, fitness, and sports medicine related topics to both local and national audiences including the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, the American Heart Association, and the American Medical Athletic Association.

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