Colliding Continents: A geological exploration of the Himalaya, Karakoram, and Tibet

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OUP Oxford, Mar 28, 2013 - Science - 464 pages
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The crash of the Indian plate into Asia is the biggest known collision in geological history, and it continues today. The result is the Himalaya and Karakoram - one of the largest mountain ranges on Earth. The Karakoram has half of the world's highest mountains and a reputation as being one of the most remote and savage ranges of all. In this beautifully illustrated book, Mike Searle, a geologist at the University of Oxford and one of the most experienced field geologists of our time, presents a rich account of the geological forces that were involved in creating these mountain ranges. Using his personal accounts of extreme mountaineering and research in the region, he pieces together the geological processes that formed such impressive peaks.
 

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User Review  - NielsenGW - LibraryThing

120 million years ago, the Indian tectonic plate broke off from the main continental masses and began a northward trek that lasted 70 million years. Even though it was only moving 5 to 6 centimeters a ... Read full review

Contents

Oceans and Continents
Kashmir Ladakh Zanskar
The Dreaming Spires of the Karakoram
Pressure Temperature Time and Space
Frozen Rivers and Fault Lines
Kohistan Hindu Kush Pamirs
Faces of Everest
Mapping the Geology of Everest and Makalu
Tibet Pamirs
Burma Vietnam Yunnan Thailand
ii
The SumatraAndaman
xxx
The Making of the Himalaya Karakoram and Tibetan
liii
Appendix A Basic Concepts and Definitions of Rock
lxvii
Appendix B Glossary
lxxxiv
Local Glossary
c
References
85

Annapurna Manaslu
Nanga Parbat Namche Barwa
Community Action Nepal
108
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Mike Searle has worked for the last 30 years on the geology of the Himalaya, Karakoram, Tibet, and Southeast Asia. He combines geological field investigations with mountaineering expeditions to the greater ranges, and has published more than 130 papers in peer-reviewed journals. He is the author of Geology and Tectonics of the Karakoram Mountains (Wiley-Blackwell, 1991) and has co-edited four books for the Geological Society of London. He has published a Geological Map of the Mount Everest region, Nepal and South Tibet (2003, 2007) and has given numerous talks about the region.

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