Colonial Legislation on the Subject of Education: Two Letters, Originally Addressed to the Editor of the Hamilton Gazette Under the Signature of Scotus

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H. Rowsell, Printer, 1841 - Education, Higher - 16 pages
 

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Page 10 - University in the Capital of the Country, . . . would be most useful to inculcate Just principles, habits, and manners into the rising generation; to coalesce the different customs of the various descriptions of settlers . . . into one form. In short, from distinct parts and ancient prejudices to new-form, as it were, and establish one nation, and thereby strengthen the union with Great Britain and preserve a lasting obedience to His Majesty's authority.
Page 10 - ... be of peculiar importance to prevent the public interest, both in Church and State, from suffering through any ill-will or disregard which the King's subjects may bear to those persons who are in any manner concerned in its administration. " On the other hand," he continues in the same strain, " I am persuaded if, at the outset, a few pious, learned men, of just zeal and primitive manners, shall be sent to this country, with sufficient inducement to make them support this honourable banishment...
Page 14 - ... truth by Dr. Strachan himself, it has been printed constantly without comment. In the very nature of things it appears incorrect. There never was a time when Simcoe felt that the foundation of a university was within sight. In February, 1796, the year of his departure, he wrote to Bishop Mountain " I have no idea that a university will be established, though I am daily confirmed in its necessity.
Page 10 - ... these points, which ought not to be misunderstood, I only refer to your Lordship's slight experience of the habits and manners of the American settlers, to say how very different they are from those of Great Britain ; and how unlikely it is for Clergymen educated in England, with English families and propensities — habituated in every situation to a greater degree of refinement and comfort than can be found in a new country, or possibly...
Page 12 - Canada a very great body of sectaries, who, in my judgment, as it were, offer themselves to its protection and reunion. These objects would be materially promoted by a University in Upper Canada, which might, in due progress, acquire such a character as to become the place of education to many persons beyond the extent of the King's dominions.
Page 14 - I cannot but think proper for the national interests, arid commensurate with its established constitution. In particular, I have no idea that a University will be established, though I am daily confirmed in its necessity. I lament these events, from the duty I owe to my King and country, and have only to guard, that no opinion of mine be interpreted to promise beneficial effects, when the adequate causes from which they must originate are suffered to perish or are withheld.
Page 10 - In short, from distinct parts and ancient prejudices to new-form, as it were, and establish one nation, and thereby strengthen the union with Great Britain and preserve a lasting obedience to His Majesty's authority. I naturally should wish...
Page 14 - October, 1795, to Bishop Mountain: — " My views in respect to a university are totally unchanged ; they are on a solid basis, and may or may not be complied with, as my superiors shall think proper, but shall certainly appear as my system to the judgment of posterity.
Page 10 - ... of Great Britain — how unlikely it is that such persons should obtain that influence with their parishioners which may essentially promote the objects of their mission. In the infancy of such a government as that of Upper Canada, and in the general indisposition of these times to all restraint, it seems to be of peculiar importance to prevent the public interest, both in Church and State, from suffering through any ill-will or disregard which the King's subjects may bear to those persons who...
Page 12 - ... Province, but the Clergy of the Episcopal church, however dispersed, to consider with affection the parent state, to form, corroborate and unite within the United States, that powerful body of people, who naturally must prefer the alliance of Great Britain to that of France, who are mostly members of the Episcopal church, and...

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