Colonialism and Grammatical Representation: John Gilchrist and the Analysis of the Hindustani Language in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

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Wiley, Jun 26, 2007 - Foreign Language Study - 280 pages
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A detailed study of Gilchrist’s grammatical praxis which presents a picture of the complex relationship between grammatical inquiry and the politics of colonial discourse in the early years of the Indian Empire.

  • Develops a method of reading colonial grammars that acknowledges both the technical and the political dimensions of the text
  • Explores the political consequences of the choices that grammarians made that could easily elicit reactions of fear, confusion, and even contempt in colonial observers
  • Presents a picture of the complex relationship between grammatical inquiry and the politics of colonial discourse in the early years of the Indian Empire

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Contents

Prelace
1
The Political Context
23
The Personal Context
61
Copyright

8 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Richard Steadman-Jones teaches in the School of English at the University of Sheffield.

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