Colonization: A Study of the Founding of New Societies

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Ginn, 1908 - Colonization - 632 pages
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Page 460 - It is a very singular government in which every member of the administration wishes to get out of the country, and consequently to have done with the government, as soon as he can, and to whose interest, the day after he has left it, and carried his whole fortune witb him, it is perfectly indifferent though the whole country was swallowed up by an earthquake.
Page 597 - ... nature in time induces a softening of manners when the native has ceased to rebel and begun to cringe. There is this that is hopeful and wholesome about the Germans. They are quick to realize their own defects and equally quick to amend them. As in commerce, so in government, they observe, learn and master the best principles. The politician would be very shortsighted who underrated the greatness of the German character, or reckoned on the evanescence of German dominion in strange lands.
Page 57 - Nec ignoro ingrati ac segnis animi existimari posse merito, si obiter atque in transcursu ad hunc modum dicatur terra omnium terrarum alumna eadem et parens, numine deum electa quae caelum ipsum clarius faceret, sparsa congregaret imperia ritusque molliret et tot populorum discordes ferasque linguas sermonis commercio contrarierei ad conloquia et humanitatem homini daret breviterque una cunctarum gentium in toto orbe patria 40 fieret.
Page 289 - In fact, every mission was an industrial school, where the simple arts were taught by the friars, themselves in origin plain Spanish peasants. The discipline of the mission was as minute as that of a school : the unmarried youth and maidens were locked in at night; the day's work began and ended with prayers and the catechism; each Indian, besides...
Page 597 - There is this that is hopeful and wholesome about the Germans. They are quick to realize their own defects and equally quick to amend them. As in commerce, so in government, they observe, learn and master the best principles. The politician would be very shortsighted who underrated the greatness of the German character, or reckoned on the evanescence of German dominion in strange lands.
Page 460 - It is the interest of the East India Company considered as sovereigns, that the European goods which are carried to their Indian dominions should be sold there as cheap as possible ; and that the Indian goods which are brought from thence should bring there as good a price, or should be sold there as dear as possible. But the reverse of this is their interest as merchants. As sovereigns, their interest is exactly the same with that of the country which they govern. As merchants, their interest is...
Page 320 - Aires had been opened to the extent of admitting two small vessels annually, an ox was worth $i, a sheep from 3 to 4 cents, and a mare 10 cents. The prices had risen to this amount from a still lower point under the influence of the demand made by these vessels for hides, strengthened by the larger demand of the contraband trade of the English and Portuguese.
Page 460 - Of all the expedients that can well be contrived to stunt the natural growth of a new colony, that of an exclusive company is undoubtedly the most effectual.
Page 290 - ... the territory of the Missions. In this protracted struggle, the secular arm continually tends to withdraw the reduced Indian from the monastic hierarchy, and the missionaries are gradually superseded by vicars. The whites, and the castes of mixed blood, favoured by the corregidors, establish themselves among the Indians. The Missions become Spanish villages, and the natives lose even the remembrance of their natural language. Such is the progress of civilization from the coasts toward the interior;...
Page 477 - To the natives it promised increased prosperity and a lighter burden of taxation, as a result of the fuller utilization of their chances under the far-sighted management of Europeans. The labor that before through carelessness and ignorance would have been wasted in idleness or in the cultivation of some cheap and superfluous crop was to supply a product of great value in the world market, and the natives were to share in the resulting profits. Van den Bosch justified his proposal not only by the...

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