Color Atlas and Manual of Microscopy for Criminalists, Chemists, and Conservators

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CRC Press, Sep 29, 2003 - Law - 313 pages
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Professionals in many disciplines, from archeology to forensic science and anthropology, must be able to identify organic and inorganic fibers and particles. In a single source, this book presents a range of simple methods to help readers quickly characterize and identify a broad range of materials. Covering substances such as hair and fibers, minerals and soils, paints, drugs, and dust, the book presents the basic principles of microscopy and directions for sample preparation and examination. Most importantly, it offers more than 400 color photomicrographs of the most commonly encountered materials for specimen comparison and rapid identification.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Basic Light Microscopy
1
Chapter 2 Preliminary Examination Stereomicroscopy and Basic Sample Preparation
21
Chapter 3 Basic Observations and Measurements with Polarized Light Microscopy
37
Chapter 4 Chemical Microscopy and Microtechnique
49
Chapter 5 Identification and Comparison of Human Hair
57
Chapter 6 Animal Hair Identification
69
Chapter 7 Synthetic Fiber Identification
77
Chapter 8 Natural Fiber Identification
89
Chapter 11 Soil and Mineral Examination
135
Chapter 12 Gemstone Identification
151
Chapter 13 Dust Examination
165
Chapter 14 Case Studies
185
Human Hair Atlas
217
Animal Hair Atlas
239
Synthetic Fibers
257
Paints and Pigments
273

Natural Fiber Appendix
100
Chapter 9 Textile Examination
109
Chapter 10 Paint Examination
123
Back cover
303
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Page 4 - The index of refraction n^ of a medium is the ratio of the speed of light in a vacuum to the speed of light in the medium, n^ = C/Cm.
Page 4 - Instead of the white light you have now all the colors of the rainbow— red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet.
Page 3 - NA = n sin a (4) where n is the refractive index of the medium between the specimen and the front lens of the objective and a is half the aperture angle of the most oblique rays entering the front lens of the objective (see Figure 13).

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