Comedy in Music: A Historical Bibliographical Resource Guide

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001 - Music - 234 pages
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Providing a general overview of comic music, this reference outlines the history of important comic musical genres, considers interconnections among seemingly disparate humorous repertory, and includes an extensive bibliography and discography. The narrative challenges the notion that serious works are more important than comic works. Many supposed tragic works include comic elements and abstract genres, such as the symphony or string quartet. The narrative discusses almost 1,000 works, each cross referenced to publication information. The bibliography includes over 800 books, dissertations, reference sources, and articles. By tracing the development of major comic genres, this unique guide to comic music also examines how absurdity influenced the avante-garde developments of the 20th century.

This study of comic music will appeal to musicologists, musicians, and music students. The relationships drawn between familiar and obscure works allow for a fuller understanding of the aesthetics of comic expression. Cross-referenced throughout, this resource is a much needed and useful guide to further research.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Medieval Period
9
The Renaissance Period
15
The Baroque Period
29
The Classic Period
41
The Romantic Period
55
The Contemporary Period
77
Bibliography
101
BOOKS
102
DISSERTATIONS
115
DICTIONARIES ENCYCLOPEDIAS AND REFERENCE WORKS
122
ARTICLES
124
Musical Works Cited and Discography
151
Index
211
Copyright

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Page 2 - Comedy is an art form that arises naturally wherever people are gathered to celebrate life, in spring festivals, triumphs, birthdays, weddings, or initiations. For it expresses the elementary strains and resolutions of animate nature, the animal drives that persist even in human nature, the delight man takes in his special mental gifts that make him the lord of creation; it is an image of human vitality holding its own in the world amid the surprises of unplanned coincidence.
Page 2 - It is a significant function — that is to say, there is some sense to it. In play there is something "at play" which transcends the immediate needs of life and imparts meaning to the action.

About the author (2001)

ENRIQUE ALBERTO ARIAS is Assistant Professor at the School for New Learning, DePaul University, and the President of Ars Musica Chicago. He is the author of Alexander Tcherepnin: A Bio-Bibliography (Greenwood, 1989).

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