Comets, Popular Culture, and the Birth of Modern Cosmology

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Princeton University Press, 1999 - Science - 365 pages
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In a lively investigation into the boundaries between popular culture and early-modern science, Sara Schechner presents a case study that challenges the view that rationalism was at odds with popular belief in the development of scientific theories. Schechner Genuth delineates the evolution of people's understanding of comets, showing that until the seventeenth century, all members of society dreaded comets as heaven-sent portents of plague, flood, civil disorder, and other calamities. Although these beliefs became spurned as "vulgar superstitions" by the elite before the end of the century, she shows that they were nonetheless absorbed into the science of Newton and Halley, contributing to their theories in subtle yet profound ways.

Schechner weaves together many strands of thought: views of comets as signs and causes of social and physical changes; vigilance toward monsters and prodigies as indicators of God's will; Christian eschatology; scientific interpretations of Scripture; astrological prognostication and political propaganda; and celestial mechanics and astrophysics. This exploration of the interplay between high and low beliefs about nature leads to the conclusion that popular and long-held views of comets as divine signs were not overturned by astronomical discoveries. Indeed, they became part of the foundation on which modern cosmology was built.

 

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Contents

Shared Culture Separate Spaces
3
SIGNS OF THE TIMES
15
Ancient Signs
17
Monsters and the Messiah
27
Divination
51
Portents and Politics
66
NATURAL CAUSES
89
From Natural Signs to Proximate Causes
91
Halleys Comet Theory Noahs Flood and the End of the World
156
COMET LORE AND COSMOGONY
179
Refueling the Sun and Planets
181
Revolution and Evolution within the Heavens
188
Popular Culture and Elite Science
216
Recent Resurgence of Cometary Catastrophism
222
NOTES
225
BIBLIOGRAPHY
309

The Decline of Cometary Divination
104
WORLD REFORMATION
131
Comets Transmutations and World Reform in Newtons Thought
133

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About the author (1999)

Schechner is a scholar-in-residence at the American Institute of Physics and a research fellow at the National Museum of American History.

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