Coming Home to Eat: The Pleasures and Politics of Local Foods

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2002 - Cooking - 330 pages
5 Reviews
In our molecules and in our dreams, we really are what we eat. Eating close to home is not just a matter of convenience't is an act of deeply sensual, cultural, and environmental significance. Gary Paul Nabhan's experience with food permeates his life as a first-generation Lebanese American, as an avid gardener and subsistence hunter-gatherer, as an ethnobotanist preserving seed diversity, and as an activist devoted to recovering native food traditions to restore the health of Native Americans in the Southwest. To rediscover what it might mean to "know your foodshed," he spent a year trying to eat only foods grown, fished, or gathered within two hundred miles of his home'ith surprising results. In Coming Home to Eat, Nabhan draws these experiences together in a book that is a culmination of his life's work'nd a vibrant portrait of the essential cultural relations to the foods that truly nourish us, affirming our bonds to family, community, landscape, and season.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jarvenpa - LibraryThing

A thought provoking book indeed. Disclaimer, I'm a vegetarian, so the sequences about slaughter of nicely raised critters just provoked in my mind "really, you don't need to do that!". But fascinating ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - quantum_flapdoodle - LibraryThing

The author tells a good story, bringing the characters to life, as he describes his year of eating locally. He would eat nothing for a year but that which was grown in his own locality - a difficult ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Preface and Acknowledgments
13
Introduction
17
Eating My Way through House and Homeland
31
Purging the Canned Making Room for the Fresh
42
Coping with Death and the Life Thereafter
55
Riding the Dunes and Finding the Ghosts
67
Dead Chemicals or Peaches Eaten Alive
84
Summer The Fertile Months
101
The Fertile Valleys and Their Wild Varmints
208
Sea Turtle Soup and By Catch Stew
216
The Nomads Movable Feast and the Taste of Island Chicken
224
Hunting Mushrooms and Grilling Salmon
238
Feasting with the Dead
244
Winter The Reflective Months
253
Of Vinegars Fermented and Memories Curdled
255
The WTO in Seattle and the Spirit of St Louis
262

Saguaro Fruit and Cactus Icons
103
Mesquite Tortillas and Duck Eggs
118
Tomato Hornworms and Summer Storms
133
Scouting for Wild Greens and Chiles
139
Seed Saving and Foraging in the Heartland
151
The Frontera Grill and the Frontiers of Technology
165
From Toxic Cornfields to Rattlesnake Roadkills
172
Autumn The Feasting Months
189
Chapter Thirteen
191
Hunting Quail and Stalking Scavengers
275
Mexicos Breadbasket of Toxins and Migrants
281
The Desert Walk for Heritage and Health
289
Epilogue
303
Cornucopia of Native Foods Eaten within the Sonoran DesertGulf of California Foodshed
305
Further Reading
307
Sustainable Food Organizations
311
Index
317
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About the author (2002)

He is a prize-winning author & naturalist, lives in Tucson, where he is director of conservation biology at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum & cofounder of Native Seeds/Search.

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