Commentaries on the Laws of England in One Volume Together with a Copious Glossary of Writers Referred To, and a Chart of Descent of English Sovereigns

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West Publishing Company, 1897 - Great Britain - 808 pages
 

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Page 172 - land " includes not only the face of the earth, but everything under it or over it.
Page 565 - Equity, then, in its true and genuine meaning, is the soul and spirit of all law: positive law is construed, and rational law is made, by it. In this, equity is synonymous, to justice; in that, to the true sense and sound interpretation of the rule.
Page 595 - But if he be found, he shall restore sevenfold; he shall give all the substance of his house.
Page 44 - Not by absolutely stripping the subject of his property in an arbitrary manner ; but by giving him a full indemnification and equivalent for the injury thereby sustained.
Page 144 - The husband is bound to provide his wife with necessaries by law, as much as himself; and, if she contracts debts for them, he is obliged to pay them; but for anything besides necessaries he is not chargeable.
Page 203 - They could not leave their lord without his permission ; but if they ran away, or were purloined from him, might be claimed and recovered by action, like beasts, or other chattels. They held indeed small portions of land, by way : of sustaining themselves and families, but it was at the mere will of the lord, who might dispossess them whenever he pleased...
Page 520 - Special juries were originally introduced in trials at bar, -when the causes were of too great nicety for the discussion of ordinary freeholders; or where the sheriff was suspected of partiality, though not upon such apparent cause as to warrant an exception to him.
Page 604 - ... receive the sacrament of the Lord's supper, according to the usage of the Church of England...
Page 32 - Such colonists carry with them only so much of the English law as is applicable to their own situation and the condition of an infant colony; such, for instance, as the general rules of inheritance, and of protection from personal injuries.
Page 326 - A recognisance is an obligation of record, which a man enters into before some court of record or magistrate duly authorized, with condition to do some particular act ; as to appear at the assizes, to keep the peace, to pay a debt, or the like.

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