Commentary on Romans

Front Cover
Kregel Publications, 2003 - Religion - 224 pages
5 Reviews

The indispensable look at the book of the Bible that turned the church on its head--through the eyes of the man that lit the fires of the Reformation. Written by the great reformer, this practical commentary acquaints the reader with the fundamentals of Luther's evangelical teachings and the roots of the Reformation. Included are a powerful introduction, which impressed the truth of Christ's salvation upon the heart of John Wesley, and explanatory notes and headings by translator J. Theodore Mueller.

  • Gives deep insight into the book of Romans
  • Provides an understanding of the roots of reformed theology
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - exinanition - LibraryThing

What can one say about the incomparable Martin Luther? This book is amazingly ey-opening to scripture. Extremely insightful. An explanation of the very scripture which started the Protestant movement. Great book. I love it and I reread it often. Read full review

User Review  - silverfox - Christianbook.com

Luther, like several other great thinkers, could not come to peace with justification by any other means, no matter how hard he tried. It was only by grace that we achieve a right relationship with ... Read full review

Contents

ROMANS ONE
27
ROMANS Two
51
ROMANS THREE
65
ROMANS FOUR
81
ROMANS Six
99
ROMANS EIGHT
117
ROMANS NINE
135
ROMANS ELEVEN
154
ROMANS THIRTEEN
179
ROMANS FOURTEEN
193
ROMANS FIFTEEN
207
ROMANS SIXTEEN
221
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Romans
Art Ross,Martha Stevenson
Limited preview - 1999
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About the author (2003)

Martin Luther (1483-1546) was born in Germany and is famous for his protest, The Ninety-five Theses, which he nailed to the door of the castle church of Wittenberg. The son of middle-class parents, Luther left his comfortable life to become a monk. Luther's own spiritual awakening was sparked by his study of the Greek text of Paul's letter to the Romans, which challenged him with the statement, "The just shall live by faith.

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