Commercial English for Secondary Schools

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Goodyear-Marshall Publishing Company, 1918 - Commercial correspondence - 213 pages
 

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Page 5 - O a homeless man, who has no spot on this wide world which he can truly call his own, , there is a momentary - feeling of something like independence and territorial consequence, when, after a weary day's travel, he kicks off his boots, thrusts his feet into slippers, and stretches himself before an inn fire.
Page 14 - ... what direction it proceeded I found it impossible to say) a low and apparently distant, but harsh, protracted, and most unusual screaming or grating sound — the exact counterpart of what my fancy had already conjured up for the dragon's unnatural shriek as described by the romancer. Oppressed as I certainly was, upon the occurrence of this second and most extraordinary coincidence, by a thousand conflicting sensations, in which wonder and extreme terror were predominant, I still retained sufficient...
Page 184 - Words ending in y preceded by a consonant generally change y to i before a suffix. 3. Monosyllables and words accented on the last syllable ending in a single consonant preceded by a single vowel double the final consonant before a suffix beginning with a vowel.
Page 197 - Howe'er it be, it seems to me 'Tis only noble to be good. Kind hearts are more than coronets, And simple faith than Norman blood.
Page 14 - ... the door of the chamber ; and thus I could but partially perceive his features, although I saw that his lips trembled as if he were murmuring inaudibly. His head had dropped upon his breast, yet I knew that he was not asleep, from the wide and rigid opening of the eye as I caught a glance of it in profile. The motion of his body too was at variance with this idea, — for he rocked from side to side with a gentle yet constant and uniform sway.
Page 207 - ... spread spread spread spring sprang sprung stand stood stood steal stole stolen stick stuck stuck sting stung stung stink...
Page 185 - Monosyllables and words accented on the last syllable, ending in a single consonant preceded by a single vowel, double the final consonant before a suffix beginning with a vowel; as, begin, beginning; run, running; put, putting; shop, shopping; prefer, preferred.
Page 170 - Maryland Md. Massachusetts Mass. Michigan Mich. Minnesota Minn. Mississippi Miss. Missouri Mo. Montana Mont. Nebraska Nebr. Nevada Nev. New Hampshire NH New Jersey NJ New Mexico N. Mex. New York NY North Carolina NC North Dakota N. Dak. Ohio Ohio Oklahoma Okla.
Page 207 - Swim swam swum Swing swung swung Take took taken Teach taught taught Tear tore torn Tell told told Think thought thought Thrive throve thriven Throw threw thrown...
Page 14 - From a position fronting my own, he had gradually brought round his chair, so as to sit with his face to the door of the chamber; and thus I could but partially perceive his features, although I saw that his lips trembled as if he were murmuring inaudibly. His head had dropped upon his breast— yet I knew that he was not asleep, from the wide and rigid opening of the eye as I caught a glance of it in profile.

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