Pamphlets on Dendrology, Volume 7

Front Cover
1922 - Trees
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Page 7 - Against the earth's sweet flowing breast; A tree that looks at God all day, And lifts her leafy arms to pray; A tree that may in summer wear A nest of robins in her hair; Upon whose bosom snow has lain; Who intimately lives with rain. Poems are made by fools like me, But only God can make a tree.
Page 17 - Twig two-thirds natural size. scales. The recent shoots are short, stout and more or less covered with a downy growth. The leaves are large, strong-scented and hairy, composed of 7 to 9 obovate to oblong, pointed leaflets which turn a beautiful yellow in the fall. The flowers, like those of all other hickories, are of two kinds on the same tree ; the male in threebranched catkins, the female in clusters of 2 to 5. The fruit is oval, nearly round or slightly pearshaped with a very thick, strong-scented...
Page 37 - When mature, they are almost leathery in texture. The beech produces a dense shade. The winter buds are long, slender and pointed. The bark is, perhaps, the most distinctive characteristic, as it maintains an unbroken, light gray surface throughout its life. So tempting is this smooth expanse to the owner of a jackknife that the beech has been well designated the "initial tree." The little, brown, three-sided beech nuts are almost as well known as chestnuts. They form usually in pairs in a prickly...
Page 62 - The leaves are alternate, simple, oval to lance-like in shape, with edges broken by many fine incurved teeth, thick and shiny above, and paler beneath. The fruit is dull purplish black, about as large as a pea, and is borne in long hanging clusters. It ripens in late summer, and is edible, although it has a slightly bitter taste. The wood is reddish brown with yellowish sapwood, moderately heavy, hard, strong, fine-grained, and does not warp or split in seasoning. It is valuable for its lustre and...
Page 64 - The bark on young branches is smooth and green in color; on old trees it is thin, grayish to light brown and deeply divided. The leaves are compound, with usually 3 leaflets (rarely 5 or 7), opposite, smooth and lustrous, green, and borne on a leaf stem or petiole 2 to 3 inches long. The leaflets are 2 to 4 inches long by 1 to 2 inches wide, making the whole leaf 5 to 8 inches in length. The seed is a samara, or key, winged similarly to that of a sugar maple, but smaller. It ripens in late summer...
Page 50 - It reaches an average height of 60 to 70 feet and a diameter of 4 to 5 feet. The bark is dark gray, divided into irregular, flat-topped, thick ridges, and is generally firm, though on old trees it tends to come off in flakes. An incision into the inner bark will show alternate layers of brown and white. The leaves are alternate, simple, 4 to 6 inches long, rather thick, somewhat one - sided, doubly toothed on the margin, and generally smooth above and downy below.
Page 36 - The flowers are borne in catkins separately on the same tree; the male catkin about iy2 inches long, the female about three-fourths of an inch, with small, leaf-like, 3-lobed green scales. The fruit is a nutlet about one-third of an inch long. It falls, attached to the leaf-like scale which acts as a wing in aiding its distribution by the wind. The wood is tough, close-grained, heavy and strong. It is sometimes selected for use for levers, tool handles, wooden cogs, mallets, wedges, etc. The tree...
Page 9 - WITHIN its natural range, which includes practically the entire eastern half of the United States, the white oak is one of the most important timber trees. It commonly reaches a height of 60 to 100 feet and a diameter of 2 to 3 feet ; sometimes it becomes much larger.
Page 27 - The recent shoots are short, stout and more or less covered with a downy growth. The leaves are large, strong-scented and hairy, composed of 7 to 9 obovate to oblong, pointed leaflets which turn a beautiful yellow in the fall. The flowers, like those of all other hickories, are of two kinds on the same tree ; the male in threebranched catkins, the female in clusters of 2 to 5. The fruit is oval, nearly round or slightly pearshaped with a very thick, strong-scented husk which splits nearly to the...
Page 71 - berries," are contained in one head. They are relished by birds, squirrels and other animals. The WOOD is hard, heavy, strong, very close-grained, brown to red in color. It is in great demand for cottonmill machinery, turnery handles and forms. One other tree has quite similar wood — the persimmon. The dogwood, with its masses of early spring flowers, its dark-red autumn foliage and its bright-red berries, is probably our most ornamental native tree. It should be used much more extensively in roadside...

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