Common Ground: The Struggle for Ownership of the Black Hills National Forest

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Rowman & Littlefield, 1996 - Business & Economics - 191 pages
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This fascinating study of the role property rights play in preserving natural resources traces the changing uses of the Black Hills National Forest, from its beginnings in 1898 to the present day. Geores argues that, contrary to widely-held notions, local management of property does not lead inevitably to the degradation of resources. Rather, the Black Hills National Forest has flourished as a multiple-use environment when local people have actively helped manage it instead of leaving its care to the Forest Service.
 

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Contents

The Black Hills National Forest Is More Than Trees
1
Controversy over the Public Domain
4
Sustainable Use of National Forests
5
How Can a National Forest Be a Common Property Resource?
7
What Is a Common Property Resource?
8
The Process of Defining a Common Property Resource
12
The Black Hills
15
Why Study the Black Hills National Forest?
17
Ranchers and Stockmen as Part of the Community
67
Exclusions from the Forest Community
68
The Sustainable Management Scheme
70
Summary of the Period
77
Dissolution of the Common Property Scheme
79
The Role of the Timber Sector
81
The Role of the Grazing Sector
86
The Role of the Mining Sector
92

How Does One Demonstrate Ownership of a US National Forest as a Common Property Resource?
20
Structure of the Book
25
The Early Years in the Black Hills
29
The Discovery of a Potential Resource by EuroAmericans
31
Creation of an OpenAccess Gold Mine1875 to 1897
34
Creating the Forest Reserve
40
Gaining Public Support for the National Forest
43
Asserting Control through Regulation of Activity
46
Grazing Regulation
48
Protecting Land by Fencing
51
Results of the Definition Change
53
The Simple Common Property Resource Period 1905 to 1919
57
Redefining the Black Hills National Forest as a Resource
58
Creating the Forest Community
59
Sorting Out Illegal Forest Homesteaders
60
Adding Agriculturalists
61
Adding Recreationists
62
Miners as Part of the Community
64
Timber Users as Part of the Community
65
The Role of the Recreation Sector
96
The Addition of Monuments Marking Contested Space
102
Changes in this NonCommon Property Period
109
Reconstructing a Forest Community
111
The State of the Forest in the Late 1960s
113
Redefining Multiple Use
115
The Role of Timber in the Redefinition
118
The Role of Mining in the Redefinition
120
The Role of Roads in the Redefinition
122
The New Forest Community
123
Thoughts about the Period from the Late 1960s to 1985
130
Life under the Forest Plan19851993
131
How Would National Forests Gain by Using a Common Property Framework?
137
The Benefits of the Common Property Framework for All National Forests
144
Bibliography
147
Index
179
About the Author
191
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