Common Ground in a Liquid City: Essays in Defense of an Urban Future

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ReadHowYouWant.com, Sep 8, 2010 - 384 pages
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In a world where the flow of money and jobs and people is largely determined by the whims of global capital, Matt Hern's Common Ground in a Liquid City is a refreshingly down-to-earth look at the importance of place in the urban future. Using his own hometown of Vancouver - the poster city for ''sustainable'' urban development - as a foil, Matt travels around the globe in search of the elements that make our cities livable. Along the way, he pieces together a very different picture of urban renewal, one in which place regains its flavor and its funk, and cities become much more than bland investment opportunities. Each of Hern's ten chapters focuses on a central theme of city life; diversity, street life, crime, population density, water and natural life, gentrification, and globalism. What emerges in the end is an appealing portrait of what the urban future might look like - environmentally friendly, locally focused, and governed from below.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - abclaret - LibraryThing

Part of a review I wrote due to appear in Freedom Magazine, March 2011. Matt Hern lives in Vancouver, Canada. Vancouver has major endorsements like Expo 86, the Commonwealth games and as recently as ... Read full review

Contents

KEEPING IT REAL
21
THE END OF LAWNS AS WE KNOW THEM
50
NO RECIPE FOR URBAN FUNK
89
WHERE THE RAPIDS ARE
121
SNAKE EYES
160
SUSTAINING PRIVILEGE
189
BAIT AND SWITCH
226
URBAVORE
258
AQUACULTURE
292
OUTRO
321
BIOS OF PEOPLE I INTERVIEWED
335
Matt Hern
364
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Matt Hern is the director of the Purple Thistle centre, an alternative youth program in Vancouver, BC. He holds a a PhD in Urban Studies from the Union Institute. An accomplished writer and public speaker, he has written three books: "Deschooling Our Lives", "Field Day: Getting Society Out of School" and "Watch Yourself: Why Safer Isn't Always Better". He lives with his partner and two daughters in East Vancouver.

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