Community Policing, Chicago Style

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Oxford University Press, Dec 2, 1999 - Social Science - 272 pages
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Police departments across the country are busily "reinventing" themselves, adopting a new style known as "community policing". This approach to policing involves organizational decentralization, new channels of communication with the public, a commitment to responding to what the community thinks their priorities ought to be, and the adoption of a broad problem-solving approach to neighborhood issues. Police departments that succeed in adopting this new stance have an entirely different relationship to the public that they serve. Chicago made the transition, embarking on what is now the nation's largest and most impressive community policing program. This book, the first to examine such a project, looks in depth at all aspects of the program--why it was adopted, how it was adopted, and how well it has worked.
 

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Contents

I
3
II
20
III
38
IV
70
V
110
VI
161
VII
194
VIII
236
IX
247
X
255
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Page 5 - In general, community policing relies upon organizational decentralization and a reorientation of patrol in order to facilitate two-way communication between police and the public. It assumes a commitment to broadly focused, problem-oriented policing and requires that police are responsive to citizen demands when they decide what local problems are and set their priorities. It also implies a commitment to helping neighborhoods solve crime problems on their own, through community organizations and...
Page 5 - ... neighborhood substations, conducting surveys to identify local problems, organizing meetings and crime prevention seminars, publishing newsletters, helping form Neighborhood Watch groups, establishing advisory panels to inform police commanders, organizing youth activities, conducting drug education projects and media campaigns, patrolling on horses and bicycles, and working with municipal agencies to enforce health and safety regulations.
Page 5 - It involves reforming decision-making processes and creating new cultures within police departments; it is not a packet of specific tactical plans.

References to this book

Social Capital
David Halpern
Limited preview - 2005
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About the author (1999)

Wesley G. SkoganR, the author of numerous books and articles on the relationship between crime and society, is Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University. Susan M. Hartnett was the Project Director for the Chicago study at Northwestern University's Institute for Policy Research.

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