Company

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Mar 13, 2007 - Fiction - 352 pages
26 Reviews

Stephen Jones is a shiny new hire at Zephyr Holdings. From the outside, Zephyr is just another bland corporate monolith, but behind its glass doors business is far from usual: the beautiful receptionist is paid twice as much as anybody else to do nothing, the sales reps use self help books as manuals, no one has seen the CEO, no one knows exactly what they are selling, and missing donuts are the cause of office intrigue. While Jones originally wanted to climb the corporate ladder, he now finds himself descending deeper into the irrational rationality of company policy. What he finds is hilarious, shocking, and utterly telling.

 

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User Review  - fulner - LibraryThing

So I "read" this audio book after listening to Jennifer Government, Berry's previous book, and completely loving it. However, this was not nearly as good. Berry's social agenda wrapped in so-called ... Read full review

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User Review  - earthforms - LibraryThing

I basically enjoyed this, but the last chapter felt rushed and unnecessary. It was like those end montages of movies where they write text on the screen about what everyone is doing now. I'd rather it had just ended before "April." Read full review

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About the author (2007)

Max Barry began removing parts at an early age. In 1999, he successfully excised a steady job at tech giant HP in order to upgrade to the more compatible alternative of manufacturing fiction. While producing three novels, he developed the online nation simulation game NationStates, as well as contributing to various open source software projects and developing religious views on operating systems. He did not leave the house much. For Machine Man, Max wrote a website to deliver pages of fiction to readers via email and RSS. He lives in Melbourne, Australia, with his wife and two daughters, and is 38 years old. He uses vi.

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