Comparative Elite Sport Development

Front Cover
Barrie Houlihan, Mick Green
Routledge, Nov 19, 2007 - Business & Economics - 316 pages
There is a paucity of academic work in the area of elite sport development despite there being ample evidence that achieving international sporting success is of increasing importance to the public (exemplified by consistent media interest in elite success or the lack of it) and to governments in most developed countries who have, almost without exception, increased the level of public funding for elite squad development often to the detriment of other sports policy objectives such as increasing general levels of participation.

Comparative Elite Sport Development: systems, structures and public policy focuses on the identification and development of elite sporting talent especially in Olympic sports. Written by a team of international contributors it applies a reflective and analytical approach, and both informs, and is informed by, established bodies of theory in policy analysis. Uniquely, it adopts a comparative approach of policy rivals, leading 'sports powers' and policy innovators, which provides broad and thorough analytical coverage.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Comparative elite sport development
1
Chapter 2 China
26
Chapter 3 Japan
53
Chapter 4 Singapore
83
Chapter 5 Germany
115
Chapter 6 France
147
Chapter 7 Poland
166
Chapter 8 Norway
194
Chapter 9 New Zealand
218
Chapter 10 United States
242
Chapter 11 Conclusion
272
Index
295
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About the author (2007)

Barrie Houlihan is Professor of Sport Policy in the School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, UK.

Mick Green was a Senior Lecturer in Sport Policy and Management in the School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, UK.

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