Comparative Legal Studies: Traditions and Transitions

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Pierre Legrand, Roderick Munday
Cambridge University Press, Aug 14, 2003 - Law
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The 14 essays that make up this 2003 volume are written by leading international scholars to provide an authoritative survey of the state of comparative legal studies. Representing such varied disciplines as the law, political science, sociology, history and anthropology, the contributors review the intellectual traditions that have evolved within the discipline of comparative legal studies, explore the strengths and failings of the various methodologies that comparatists adopt and, significantly, explore the directions that the subject is likely to take in the future. No previous work had examined so comprehensively the philosophical and methodological foundations of comparative law. This is quite simply a book with which anyone embarking on comparative legal studies will have to engage.
 

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Contents

Comparative legal studies and its legacies
29
Comparative legal studies and its boundaries
129
Comparative legal studies and its theories
195
Comparative legal studies and its futures
435
Conclusion
491
Index
511
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