Comparative Treatments for Borderline Personality Disorder

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Springer Pub., 2005 - Psychology - 303 pages
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Within the field of clinical psychology, the term borderline personality disorder was developed to fulfill a diagnostic need and has come to possess specific stereotypes and negative meanings. Because the term borderline is an emotionally charged word, it can lead to a less-than-accurate view of the situation or patient being described, thus presenting a challenge to even the most experienced therapists and becoming one of the most complex disorders to treat.

Through the use of one case study, however, experts in borderline personality disorders have put this difficulty at ease. Applying a variety of modalities to identify treatment goals, including: selecting assessment tools, conceptualizing progression, pinpointing pitfalls, and developing techniques, diagnosing and treating BPD has created a more successful therapeutic result.

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Contents

Linda P
21
Dialectical Behavior Therapy
49
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
75
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Mark H. Stone, PsyD, is a member of the Doctoral Care Faculty and a Distinguished Service Professor at the Adler School of Professional Psychology. Dr. Stone earned his BA and BM at North Park University, his MM at the Chicago Musical College, and his PsyD in Clinical Psychology at Forest Institute of Professional Psychology. He is a Diplomate and Fellow of the American Board of Professional Psychology and School Psychology and of the American Board of Medical Psychotherapists. He is a Certified Supervisor and Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (AODA) counselor for Community Services for Drug and Alcohol Abuse (CSADC). He teaches courses in research methods, statistics and psychometrics, assessment of dementia, and other neuropsychological topics. His additional interests include Rasch measurement, data analysis, attention and memory, treatment of sex offenders, psychology supervision, and organizational counseling.


Donna M. Martin, PsyD, is an instructor and director of the academic support program at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, where she received her doctorate in clinical psychology. In her present position she works closely with medical students and graduate students to enhance both their successful performance and to remediate problems that arise in the graduate student population. She is currently involved with institutional outcome research to measure the effectiveness of this program's, and the school's other various interventions, on success in the first year of medical school. Dr. Martin is also manager of the Center for Brief Therapy, the PCOM training clinic, and is involved in the supervision and training of psychology practicum students and interns. She has sat on the board of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. Dr. Martin has published several articles and chapters, and has edited and co-authored a chapter in the second edition of Cognition and Psychotherapy with Arthur Freeman, EdD, Michael Mahoney, PhD, and Paul DeVito, PhD. (Springer Publishing 2004).

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