Comparative Advantage in International Trade: A Historical Perspective

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Edward Elgar Publishing, Jan 1, 1998 - Business & Economics - 258 pages
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'Historians of international trade and trade theory, intellectual historians, and students of trade theory will all benefit from Andrea Maneschi's masterful work, which takes the reader through a considerable amount of the primary literature and p
 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 The Concept of Comparative Advantage
10
22 Comparative advantage and the gains from trade
18
23 The causes of comparative advantage
21
3 Theories of International Trade up to Adam Smith
26
32 Mercantilism and the theory of trade
29
33 Gains from trade and the eighteenthcentury rule
34
34 Physiocracy and the theory of trade
38
67 Modifications of Ricardian comparative advantage
123
Alfred Marshall Vilfredo Pareto and Enrico Barone
127
72 Vilfredo Paretos general equilibrium approach to trade theory
136
73 Enrico Barones pioneering diagram of neoclassical trade equilibrium
147
Comparative advantage in the multicommodity Ricardian model
151
Gottfried Haberler Eli Heckscher and Bertil Ohlin
157
81 Gottfried Haberlers defense and elaboration of comparative cost theory
159
82 Precursors of Heckscher and Ohlin
167

35 Adam Smiths theory of foreign trade
40
4 David Ricardo Robert Torrens and the Discovery of Comparative Advantage
51
42 Dynamic and static aspects of Ricardos international trade theory
57
43 Foreign trade in the other chapters of Ricardos Principles
59
44 A dynamic model of Ricardian trade
65
45 Comparative advantage in the short run and the long run
71
Advantage Alexander Hamilton John Rae and Friedrich List
75
52 John Raes New Principles of Political Economy
85
53 Friedrich Lists National System of Political Economy
92
54 The promotion of infant industries and of infant economies
98
Comparative Advantage and the Terms of Trade
104
61 Reciprocal demand and the terms of trade
105
62 Mills Essays and the first statement of the law of international values
106
63 The MillWhewell law of international values
109
64 Foreign trade as a sort of industrial revolution
119
65 The infantindustry argument for protection
120
66 An early generalization of comparative advantage to many commodities
121
83 Eli Heckscher and the causes of comparative advantage
169
84 Bertil Ohlins Interregional and International Trade
172
85 The legacies of Haberler Heckscher and Ohlin
177
9 The HeckscherOhlin Theory Encounters the New Trade Theory
182
91 Paul Samuelson and the HeckscherOhlinSamuelson model
183
92 Ronald Joness magnification effect
185
93 Extensions to many commodities and factors of production
191
94 Gains and losses in the transition from Heckscher and Ohlin to HeckscherOhlin
198
95 The brave new world of the new trade theory
203
10 The Almost General Validity of Comparative Advantage
213
102 The HeckscherOhlin theory in the twilight of the twentieth century
219
103 The new views of comparative advantage
221
104 Varieties of neoRicardian trade models
225
a manysplendored thing
230
References
234
Index
249
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