Compensation for Losses from the 9/11 Attacks

Front Cover
Rand Corporation, 2004 - History - 173 pages
The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, caused tremendous loss of life, property, and income, and the resulting response from public and private organizations was unprecedented. This monograph examines the benefits received by those who were killed or seriously injured on 9/11 and the benefits provided to individuals and businesses in New York City that suffered losses from the attack on the World Trade Center. The authors examine the performance of the compensation system--insurance, tort, government programs, and charity--in responding to the losses stemming from 9/11.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Policy Problem
2
Organization of This Report
3
The Compensation System Terminology and Research Methods
5
Goals for a Compensation System
6
Types of Loss
7
Property Damage
8
Victim Groups
9
Source of Benefits
74
Tort
75
Charity
78
Summary of Benefits for Residents of Lower Manhattan
79
Assessment of Benefits for Residents of Lower Manhattan
81
Efficiency Issues
82
Benefits for Workers in New York City Economically Affected by the Attack on the World Trade Center
85
Source of Benefits
87

Benefits Terminology
10
Research Methods and Limitations of Analysis
11
Benefits for Those Who Died or Were Seriously Injured in the September 11 Attacks
15
Insurance
16
Tort
18
Government Programs
20
Charity
28
Summary of Benefits for Civilians Who Were Killed or Seriously Injured
31
Benefits for Emergency Responders Who Were Killed or Seriously Injured
42
Tort
43
Charity
46
Summary of Benefits for Emergency Responders Who Were Killed or Seriously Injured
47
Assessment of Benefits for Emergency Responders Who Were Killed or Seriously Injured
48
Benefits for Those with Emotional Injuries and Injuries Due to Environmental Exposure
51
Insurance
53
Tort
54
Government Programs
56
Charity
58
Summary of Benefits for Those Who Were Injured from Environmental Exposure
59
Assessment of Benefits for Those Who Were Injured from Environmental Exposure
60
Benefits for Those in New York City Who Suffered Emotional Injuries
64
Insurance
65
Tort
66
Charity
68
Summary of Benefits for Those Who Suffered Emotional Injuries
69
Benefits for Residents of Lower Manhattan
73
Charity
95
Summary of Benefits for New York City Workers Economically Affected by the Attack
98
Assessment of Benefits for New York City Workers Economically Affected by the Attack
99
Efficiency Issues
101
Benefits for New York City Businesses Affected by the Attack on the World Trade Center
103
Source of Benefits
105
Insurance
106
Tort
108
Charity
121
Summary of Benefits for Businesses Affected by the Attack
125
Assessment of Benefits for Businesses Affected by the Attack
126
Efficiency Issues
128
Total Quantified Benefits and Issues for the Future
131
Summary of Benefits by Type of Loss
134
Summary of Benefits by Compensation Mechanism
135
Issues to Address in Designing Systems to Compensate Losses from Future Terrorist Attacks
140
Issues Related to Personal Injury
141
Issues Regarding the Role of and Coordination Among the Four Compensation Mechanisms
142
Setting Priorities
144
Overview of the Four Compensation Mechanisms
145
Affiliations of Those Interviewed for This Study
151
Charitable Programs for Emergency Responders
153
Map of Lower Manhattan
157
Summary of Benefits
159
References
161
Copyright

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