Competition in Religious Life

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Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press, Dec 15, 1989 - Philosophy - 237 pages
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In his latest work on the social consequences of religious commitment, Jay Newman reveals in clear and concise fashion the extent to which competitiveness is an essential feature of religious life. His assessment charts various classical strategies that have been proposed for either eliminating such competitiveness or directing it into appropriate channels. After a detailed philosophical analysis of the nature and value of competition, the author examines competition between denominations and within denominations, and considers religious competition in some of its less obvious forms.

In the process of evaluating the methods for curbing religious competition advocated by such thinkers as Spinoza and Lessing, as well as by modern ecumenists, the author points the way to a general approach to religious competition that minimizes destructive religious conflicts without ignoring the positive value of religious competition.

 

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Contents

Theoretical
5
Chapter Two Evaluating Competition
40
Religion and Competition
48
Classic Examples
55
Recent Examples
82
Chapter Four Regulating Interdenominational
101
Ecumenist Models
118
Lessings Version of the Three Rings Parable
130
The Origin of Sects
166
Regulating Intradenominational Competition
174
Apostasy and Competition
181
Chapter Six Religious Competition Broadly
192
Antidenominationalism
198
Concluding Evaluations
207
Notes
217
Index
231

The Relevance of Economic Models
140
Chapter Five Intradenominational
147

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About the author (1989)

David Nock is a Professor of Sociology at Lakehead University.