Complete Poems

Front Cover
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, May 22, 2012 - Poetry - 736 pages
An extraordinary literary event: Daniel Mendelsohn’s acclaimed two-volume translation of the complete poems of C. P. Cavafy—including the first English translation of the poet’s final Unfinished Poems—now published in one handsome edition and featuring the fullest literary commentaries available in English, by the renowned critic, scholar, and international best-selling author of The Lost.
No modern poet so vividly brought to life the history and culture of Mediterranean antiquity; no writer dared break, with such taut energy, the early-twentieth-century taboos surrounding homoerotic desire; no poet before or since has so gracefully melded elegy and irony as the Alexandrian Greek poet Constantine Cavafy (1863–1933). Whether advising Odysseus on his return to Ithaca or confronting the poet with the ghosts of his youth, these verses brilliantly make the historical personal—and vice versa. To his profound exploration of longing and loneliness, fate and loss, memory and identity, Cavafy brings the historian’s assessing eye along with the poet’s compassionate heart.
After more than a decade of work and study, Mendelsohn—a classicist who alone among Cavafy’s translators shares the poet’s deep intimacy with the ancient world—gives readers full access to the genius of Cavafy’s verse: the sensuous rhymes, rich assonances, and strong rhythms of the original Greek that have eluded previous translators. Complete with the Unfinished Poems that Cavafy left in drafts when he died—a remarkable, hitherto unknown discovery that remained in the Cavafy Archive in Athens for decades—and with an in-depth introduction and a helpful commentary that situates each work in a rich historical, literary, and biographical context, this revelatory translation is a cause for celebration: the definitive presentation of Cavafy in English.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The PoetHistorian
xvii
A Note on Pronunciation of Proper Names
lxxiii
The City
5
i
11
King Demetrius
17
Orophernes
23
Alexandrian Kings
26
Sculptor from Tyana
32
ShamelNessim
206
Vulnerant Omnes Ultima Necat 2
212
Sweet Voices
219
Near an OpenWindow
226
The Eumenides Footfalls
232
Voice from the Sea
238
The Beyzade to His LadyLove 247
247
Song of the Heart
253

Manuel Comnenus
38
Song of Ionia
44
Went
50
Safe Haven
64
In the Month of Hathor
70
In the Street
76
The Next Table
82
To Stay
88
Of Demetrius Soter 1621 so B C
94
Young Men of Sidon 400 A D
96
Anna Comnena io i
102
Brought to Art 1
111
Epitaph of Antiochus King of Commagene 1 17
117
John Cantacuzenus Triumphs
123
In the Boring Village
129
In a Municipality of Asia Minor
132
Anna Dalassene
138
You Didnt Understand
144
Potentate from Western Libya 1
152
Alexander Jannaeus and Alexandra
160
He Asked About the Quality
166
B C
171
Contents of the Sengopoulos Notebook
179
Old Mens Souls
185
Walls
191
The Horses of Achilles
198
The Four Walls of My Room
266
Dread
280
The Bank of the Future 2 93
293
Addition
295
The Enemies
308
Hearing of Love c 32
321
The Bandaged Shoulder
333
The Regiment of Pleasure
339
More Happy Thou Performing Member
347
The Item in the Paper
355
Athanasius
361
The Dynasty
367
From the Unpublished History
368
The Patriarch
374
Crime
380
Zenobia
386
Colors
392
Poems 19161918
452
Since Nine
462
Comprehension
543
In the Presence of the Statue of Endymion
599
Further Reading
651
Aristobulus
657
Neros Deadline
664
Builders 2
667
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

Daniel Mendelsohn was born on Long Island and studied classics at the University of Virginia and at Princeton. His reviews and essays on literary and cultural subjects appear frequently in The New Yorker and The New York Review of Books. His books include a memoir, The Elusive Embrace, a New York Times Notable Book and a Los Angeles Times Best Book of the Year; the international best seller The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; and a collection of essays, How Beautiful It Is and How Easily It Can Be Broken. He teaches at Bard College.

Bibliographic information