Complete Poems

Front Cover
University of Nebraska Press, 1992 - Poetry - 171 pages
3 Reviews
Ernest Hemingway never wished to be widely known as a poet. He concentrated on writing short stories and novels, for which he won the Nobel Prize in 1956. But his poetry deserves close attention, if only because it is so revealing. Through verse he expressed anger and disgust—at Dorothy Parker and Edmund Wilson, among others. He parodied the poems and sensibilities of Rudyard Kipling, Joyce Kilmer, Robert Graves, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Gertrude Stein. He recast parts of poems by the likes of Ezra Pound and T. S. Eliot, giving them his own twist. And he invested these poems with the preoccupations of his novels: sex and desire, battle and aftermath, cats, gin, and bullfights. Nowhere is his delight in drubbing snobs and overrefined writers more apparent.

In this revised edition of the Complete Poems, the editor, Nicholas Gerogiannis, offers here an afterword assessing the influence of the collection, first published in 1979, and an updated bibliography. Readers will be particularly interested in the addition of "Critical Intelligence," a poem written soon after Hemingway's divorce from his first wife in 1927. Also available as a Bison Book: Hemingway's Quarrel with Androgyny by Mark Spilka.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JoeCottonwood - LibraryThing

Let's be truthful: As "literary" poetry, it stinks. But if poetry had a punk rock genre in the 1920s, this would be it. It's the work of a disillusioned man in his early twenties whose legs were ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - EnriqueFreeque - LibraryThing

That such a master of prose could write such wretched poetry is astonishing. Only for those curious (like me) or for the obsessed Hemingway completist, or the Hemingway scholar. This book could only ... Read full review

Contents

The Opening Game
5
Athletic Verse
11
The Ship Translated Being La Paquebot
17
A Modern Version of PoloniusAdvice
19
In a magazine
20
ToWillDavies
21
The Battle of Copenhagen
22
Oklahoma
25
There Are Seasons
59
Poem
61
Schwarzwald
62
They All Made PeaceWhat Is Peace?
63
Like Americans
65
Like Canadians
66
The Big Dance on the Hill
68
The Sport of Kings
69

Captives
26
Champs dHonneur
27
DAnnunzio
28
God is away for the summer
29
Flat Roofs
30
Night comes with soft and drowsy plumes
31
At night I lay with you
32
Lines to a Young Lady on Her Having Very Nearly Won a Vogel
33
Chapter Heading
34
Killed PiaveJuly 81918
35
Bird of Night
36
Mitrailliatrice
37
On Weddynge Gyftes
38
Ultimately
39
FOR THE HARLOT HAS A HARDLOT
40
Blood is thicker than water
41
All armies are the same
42
Shock Troops
43
Oily Weather
44
Roosevelt
45
Riparto dAssalto
46
To Good Guys Dead
47
Arsiero Asiago
49
Montparnasse
50
Along With Youth
51
The Earnest Liberals Lament
52
The Age Demanded
53
Kipling
54
Stevenson
55
Robert Graves
56
Im off n wild wimmen
57
Grass smooth on the prairies
58
The Soul of Spain with McAlmon and Bird the Publishers
70
Part Two of The Soul of Spain with McAlmon and Bird the Publishers
72
To Chink Whose Trade Is Soldiering
74
Some day when you are picked up
75
The Lady Poets With Foot Notes
77
The Poem Is By Maera
78
A Valentine and Other Offerings 19261935
83
And everything the author knows
84
I think that I have never trod
85
Little drops of grain alcohol
86
To a Tragic Poetess
87
Portrait of a Lady
90
Sequel
91
The rail ends do not meet
92
Valentine
93
Poem 1928
95
Little Mr Wilson
97
Advice to a Son
98
Lines to Be Read at the Casting of Scott Fitzgeralds Balls into the Sea from Eden Roc Antibes Alpes Maritimes
99
Farewells 19441956
101
First Poem to Mary in London
103
Poem to Mary Second Poem
107
Poetry
114
Defense of Luxembourg
115
To Crazy Christian
118
Poem to Miss Mary
119
Across the Board
120
BlackAss Poem After Talking to Pamela Churchill
121
The Road to Avallon
122
Critical Intelligence
159
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

Nicholas Gerogiannis, a professor in the Department of International Studies at Auburn University, introduces the poems and clarifies historical and literary references in explanatory notes.

Bibliographic information