Completed Field Notes: The Long Poems of Robert Kroetsch

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University of Alberta, 2000 - Poetry - 252 pages
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This book brings together twenty of Kroetsch's long poems, spanning some of 15 years of creative activity. Remarkably versatile in both form and content, these extended meditations bear witness to Kroetsch's modernist inheritance and his well-known commitment to post-modern jouissance. Whether it be in an evocation of an Australian beach or in an account of the stone hammer used by the poet's father, we find again and again the delight, elusiveness and mastery of everyday language that have become trademarks of the author's oeuvre.
 

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Contents

Stone Hammer Poem
3
FIELD NOTE
9
The Ledger
11
Seed Catalogue
29
How I Joined the Seal Herd
47
The Sad Phoenician
51
The Silent Poet Sequence
66
The Winnipeg
73
Letters to Salonika
130
Postcards from China
159
Commentary
170
The Frankfurt Hauptbahnhof
189
Sounding the Name
200
The Poets Mother
206
COUNTRY WESTERN
211
Excerpts from the Real World
213

Sketches of a Lemon
76
The Criminal Intensities of Love as Paradise
81
fi ADVICE TO MY FRIE 97 Advice to My Friends
97
Mile Zero
117
Spending the Morning on the Beach
237
After Paradise
245
Authors Note
251
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About the author (2000)

Robert Kroetsch was born on June 26, 1927 in Heisler, Alberta, Canada. He received a B.A. from the University of Alberta and a Ph.D. in creative writing from the University of Iowa. He taught English at the State University of New York in Binghamton and at the University of Manitoba. His first novel, But We Are Exiles, was published in 1965. During his lifetime, he wrote nine books of fiction, seven books of non-fiction, and fourteen collections of poetry. His works included The Words of My Roaring, Gone Indian, Badlands, Alibi, and Too Bad: Sketches Toward a Self-Portrait. He received several awards including the Governor General's Award for Fiction in 1969 for The Studhorse Man, the Lieutenant Governor's Alberta Distinguished Artist award, and the Golden Pen Award for Lifetime Achievement by the Writers Guild of Alberta. He was named and Officer of the Order of Canada in 2004. He was killed in car accident on June 21, 2011 at the age of 84.

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