Computationalism: New Directions

Front Cover
Matthias Scheutz
MIT Press, 2002 - Computers - 209 pages

Classical computationalism -- -the view that mental states are computational states -- -has come under attack in recent years. Critics claim that in defining computation solely in abstract, syntactic terms, computationalism neglects the real-time, embodied, real-world constraints with which cognitive systems must cope. Instead of abandoning computationalism altogether, however, some researchers are reconsidering it, recognizing that real-world computers, like minds, must deal with issues of embodiment, interaction, physical implementation, and semantics.This book lays the foundation for a successor notion of computationalism. It covers a broad intellectual range, discussing historic developments of the notions of computation and mechanism in the computationalist model, the role of Turing machines and computational practice in artificial intelligence research, different views of computation and their role in the computational theory of mind, the nature of intentionality, and the origin of language.

 

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Contents

ComputationalismThe Next Generation
1
The Foundations of Computing
23
Narrow versus Wide Mechanism
59
The Irrelevance of Turing Machines to Artificial Intelligence
87
The Practical Logic of Computer Work
129
Symbol Grounding and the Origin of Language
143
Authentic Intentionality
159
Epilogue
175
References
187
Index
199
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About the author (2002)

Matthias Scheutz is Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Notre Dame.

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