Computer Literacy in Human Services Education

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 1990 - Social Science - 402 pages
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This volume provides a unique and notable contribution to the investigation and exemplification of computer literacy in human services education. A significant contribution to the development of the contemporary human services curriculum, this helpful guide introduces the computer literate curriculum, explores the nature of computer literacy and its ramifications for teaching in the human services, and discusses the computer's effect on scholarly thinking.

Computer Literacy in Human Services Education is divided into two major sections, the first dealing with teaching about computers and the second addressing the use of computers in teaching. In the first section, the authors introduce the topic of computer literacy in human services education and look at some general issues which have broad implications for the educator. They also explore program-wide curriculum development and the development of individual courses. In the second section, the authors discuss computers as devices which can facilitate both learning and thinking in human services, and suggest that some theories explaining human behavior may also apply to human/computer interaction. Other topics covered in the section are the use of computers in teaching about human services, including Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI), simulations, and interactive video. The volume concludes with an examination of the ways computers can affect the thinking of scholars in teaching and in model and theory building in the human services.
 

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Computer Literacy in Human Services Education
Richard Reinoehl, B. Jeanne Mueller - Social Science - 1990 - 402 pages
This volume provides a unique and notable contribution to the investigation and
exemplification of computer literacy in human services education. A significant contribution to the development of the contemporary human services curriculum, this helpful guide introduces the computer literate curriculum, explores the nature of computer literacy and its ramifications for teaching in the human services, and discusses the computer's effect on scholarly thinking. Computer Literacy in Human Services Education is divided into two major sections, the first dealing with teaching about computers and the second addressing the use of computers in teaching. In the first section, the authors introduce the topic of computer literacy in human services education and look at some general issues which have broad implications for the educator. They also explore program-wide curriculum development and the development of individual courses. In the second section, the authors discuss computers as devices which can facilitate both learning and thinking in human services, and suggest that some theories explaining human behavior may also apply to human/computer interaction. Other topics covered in the section are the use of computers in teaching about human services, including Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI), simulations, and interactive video. The volume concludes with an examination of the ways computers can affect the thinking of scholars in teaching and in model and theory building in the human services. 

Contents

Introducing Computer Literacy in Human Services Education
3
About This Volume
10
Teaching Information Technology to Human Service
12
Automating the Social Work Office
19
Teaching Computer Literacy to Human Service Students
31
Faculty Resistance
41
Gender Inequality in Computing
45
The Leisure Industry
48
Conclusion
173
COMPUTER ASSISTED INSTRUCTION
179
Findings
187
Current
211
Current Issues Related to Computer Simulations in Mental
222
Two Illustrative Projects
231
Emotional Emergency Simulations
237
COMPUTER CONTROLLED VIDEO
247

Developing
65
Future Developments
74
The Case
77
Computer Courses in Social Work
80
The Case for a Programming Language
88
PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT
95
Implementing a Social Work Curriculum on Information
113
Issues and Concerns
119
Constructing a Computing System for a School of Social
127
Conclusion
135
COURSE DEVELOPMENT
137
Curriculum Planning
146
Teaching Information Technology to Human Service
149
Introduction
150
Course Outline
156
Partners in Thinking and Learning
167
Challenges and Risks of University Faculty Videodisc
253
A Teaching Enrichment Tool Suited Well to Human
262
Interactive Technology Impacts on Increasing Cultural
265
Talking Directly with People from Another Culture
272
Interactive Learning Models Using Videodiscs in College
277
Background
278
Conclusion
290
Formative Evaluation and Editorial Review
295
Role of the Instructional Designer
297
Teaching Students by Having Them Emulate an Expert
307
Mullins Method Converted into a Simulation Game
314
Using Computers to Explore Dilemmas
327
Computer Simulation Help with the Caring
336
What Is a Useful Simulation?
348
APPENDIX
355
Copyright

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