Computer Models of Mind: Computational Approaches in Theoretical Psychology

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Apr 29, 1988 - Medical - 289 pages
What is the mind? How does it work? How does it influence behavior? Some psychologists hope to answer such questions in terms of concepts drawn from computer science and artificial intelligence. They test their theories by modeling mental processes in computers. This book shows how computer models are used to study many psychological phenomena--including vision, language, reasoning, and learning. It also shows that computer modeling involves differing theoretical approaches. Computational psychologists disagree about some basic questions. For instance, should the mind be modeled by digital computers, or by parallel-processing systems more like brains? Do computer programs consist of meaningless patterns, or do they embody (and explain) genuine meaning?
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Patterns polyhedra imagery
10
the first three phases
12
conceptual preliminaries
27
Imagery in experiment and theory
31
Connectionist models of vision
45
Computational psychology according to Marr
49
Outline of a theory of vision
52
Computer models of speech
146
Reasoning and rationality
151
Critiques of Newell and Simon
165
Can there be a theory of problemsolving?
170
Mental models versus logical rules
175
Learning and development
187
Skills and taskanalysis
193
Metaepistemology and general principles of learning
201

representation of the intensityarray
60
Some objections
71
Further examples of connectionism
78
Parsing natural language
88
Historical background
89
Augmented transitionnetworks
91
The autonomy of syntax
102
How our minds might determine our syntax
107
Grammar liberated from context
116
The generation of syntax
118
Meaning and messages
122
Psychological semantics
130
Illbehaved sentences wellconducted conversations
137
Is development different?
210
Connectionist approaches to learning
213
Is computational psychology possible?
225
Competence and taskdefinition
226
for and against
229
Are programs pure syntax?
247
Computation and connectionism
251
Conclusion
259
References
265
Index of names
283
Index of subjects
287
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information