Computer Security Act of 1987: Hearings Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, One Hundre[d]th Congress, First Session, on H.R. 145 ... February 25, 26, and March 17, 1987

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
3
III
18
IV
39
V
75
VI
110
VII
125
VIII
137
XIII
274
XIV
311
XVI
350
XVII
365
XVIII
379
XIX
388
XX
397
XXI
404

IX
147
X
179
XI
199
XII
249
XXII
425
XXIII
428
XXIV
437

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 649 - Was it possible to lose the nation, and yet preserve the Constitution ? By general law, life and limb must be protected ; yet often a limb must be amputated to save a life, but a life is never wisely given to save a limb. I felt that measures, otherwise unconstitutional, might become lawful by becoming indispensable to the preservation of the Constitution through the preservation of the nation.
Page 658 - I know of no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves...
Page 649 - I felt that measures otherwise unconstitutional might become lawful by becoming indispensable to the preservation of the Constitution, through the preservation of the nation. Right or wrong, I assumed this ground, and now avow it. I could not feel that, to the best of my ability, I had even tried to preserve the Constitution if, to save slavery or any minor matter, I should permit the wreck of government, country, and Constitution all together.
Page 573 - Data" means information of any kind that can be used, or adapted for use, in the design, production, manufacture, utilization, or reconstruction of articles or materials.
Page 649 - A strict observance of the written laws is doubtless one of the high duties of a good citizen : but it is not the highest. The laws of necessity, of self-preservation, of saving our country when in danger, are of higher obligation.
Page 608 - President by an exertion of legislative power, but with such an authority plus the very delicate, plenary and exclusive power of the President as the sole organ of the federal government in the field of international relations...
Page 645 - When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less." "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things.
Page 616 - ... war. He has his confidential sources of information. He has his agents in the form of diplomatic, consular and other officials. Secrecy in respect of information gathered by them may be highly necessary, and the premature disclosure of it productive of harmful results. Indeed, so clearly is this true that the first President refused to accede to a request to lay before the House of Representatives the instructions, correspondence and documents relating to the negotiation of the Jay Treaty —...
Page 649 - I did understand, however, that my oath to preserve the Constitution to the best of my ability imposed upon me the duty of preserving, by every indispensable means, that government, that nation, of which that Constitution was the organic law. Was it possible to lose the nation and yet preserve the Constitution...
Page 609 - As commanderin-chief, he is authorized to direct the movements of the naval and military forces placed by law at his command, and to employ them in the manner he may deem most effectual to harass and conquer and subdue the enemy.

Bibliographic information