Computer Security: Cyber Attacks--war Without Borders : Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Government Management, Information, and Technology of the Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, Second Session, July 26, 2000

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Page 189 - ... technical assistance necessary to accomplish the interception unobtrusively and with a minimum of interference...
Page 120 - Information operations that protect and defend information and information systems by ensuring their availability, integrity, authentication, confidentiality, and nonrepudiation. This includes providing for restoration of information systems by incorporating protection, detection, and reaction capabilities.
Page 106 - To ensure and promote the widest possible mutual assistance between all criminal police authorities within the limits of the laws existing in the different countries and in the spirit of the 'Universal Declaration of Human Rights...
Page 132 - DOD officials, these methods, which include sophisticated computer viruses and automated attack routines, allow adversaries to launch untraceable attacks from anywhere in the world. According to a leading security software designer, viruses in particular are becoming more disruptive for computer users. The Melissa and "ILOVEYOU" viruses illustrated the potential disruption such attacks can cause.
Page 146 - Critical infrastructure protection and security. Computer security risks have increased dramatically over the last decade as our government and our nation have become ever more reliant on interconnected computer systems to support critical operations and infrastructures. While a number of factors have contributed to weak federal information security, such as insufficient understanding of risks, technical staff shortages, and a lack of system and security architectures, the fundamental underlying...
Page 106 - It is strictly forbidden for the Organization to undertake any intervention or activities of a political, military, religious or racial character . " Thus, some investigations are considered to be outside of INTERPOL1 s established mandate.
Page 22 - AND APPARENTLY STOLE AS MANY AS 28,000 CREDIT CARD NUMBERS WITH LOSSES ESTIMATED TO BE AT LEAST $3.5 MILLION. THOUSANDS OF CREDIT CARD NUMBERS AND EXPIRATION DATES WERE POSTED TO VARIOUS INTERNET WEB SITES. AFTER AN EXTENSIVE INVESTIGATION, ON MARCH 23, 2000, THE FBI ASSISTED THE DYFED POWYS (WALES, UK) POLICE SERVICE IN A SEARCH AT THE RESIDENCE OF...
Page 21 - ... was being established) of intrusions into more than 500 military, civilian government, and private sector computer systems in the United States, during February and March 1998. The intrusions occurred during the build-up of United States military personnel in the Persian Gulf in response to tension with Iraq over United Nations weapons inspections. The intruders penetrated at least 200 unclassified US military computer systems, including seven Air Force bases and four Navy installations, Department...
Page 132 - Internet, are revolutionizing the way our government, our nation, and much of the world communicate and conduct business. The benefits have been enormous. Vast amounts of information are now literally at our fingertips, facilitating research on virtually every topic imaginable; financial and other business transactions can be executed almost instantaneously, often on a 24-hour-a-day basis; and electronic mail.
Page 22 - Curador" compromised several e-commerce websites in the US., Canada, Thailand, Japan and the United Kingdom, and stole as many as 28,000 credit card numbers with losses estimated to be at least $3.5 million Thousands of credit card numbers and expiration dates were posted to various Internet websites.. After an extensive investigation, on March 23, 2000, the FBI assisted the Dyfed Powys (Wales, UK) Police Service in a search at the residence of "Curador,

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