Computer Security Report Card: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Government Management, Information, and Technology of the Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, Second Session, September 11, 2000

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Page 206 - THE US HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT REFORM AND OVERSIGHT SUBCOMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT MANAGEMENT, INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY July 9, 1998 Thank you, Mr.
Page 53 - ... the abilities of: • the Federal Government to perform essential national security missions and to ensure the general public health and safety; • state and local governments to maintain order and to deliver minimum essential public services'.
Page 52 - Federal computer system identified by that agency pursuant to subsection (a) that is commensurate with the risk and magnitude of the harm resulting from the loss, misuse, or unauthorized access to or modification of the information contained in such system.
Page 54 - Each agency shall identify and assess available alternatives to direct regulation, including providing economic incentives to encourage the desired behavior, such as user fees or marketable permits, or providing Information upon which choices can be made by the public.
Page 53 - Critical infrastructures are those physical and cyber-based systems essential to the minimum operations of the economy and government. They include, but are not limited to, telecommunications, energy, banking and finance, transportation, water systems and emergency services, both governmental and private.
Page 53 - ... 22, 1998 WHITE PAPER The Clinton Administration's Policy on Critical Infrastructure Protection: Presidential Decision Directive 63 May 22, 1998 This White Paper explains key elements of the Clinton Administration's policy on critical infrastructure protection. It is intended for dissemination to all interested parties in both the private and public sectors. It will also be used in US Government professional education institutions, such as the National Defense University and the National Foreign...
Page 54 - ... providing information upon which choices can be made by the private sector. These incentives, along with other actions, shall be designed to help harness the latest technologies, bring about global solutions to international problems, and enable private sector owners and operators to achieve and maintain the maximum feasible security. • The full authorities, capabilities and resources of the government, including law enforcement, regulation, foreign intelligence and defense preparedness shall...
Page 31 - ADMINISTRATOR OFFICE OF INFORMATION AND REGULATORY AFFAIRS OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY.
Page 53 - They include, but are not limited to, telecommunications, energy, banking and finance, transportation, water systems and emergency services, both governmental and private. Many of the nation's critical infrastructures have historically been physically and logically separate systems that had little interdependence. As a result of advances in information technology and the necessity of improved efficiency, however, these infrastructures have become increasingly automated and interlinked. These same...
Page 55 - Coordination: The Sector Liaison Officials and Functional Coordinators of the Lead Agencies, as well as representatives from other relevant departments and agencies, including the National Economic Council, will meet to coordinate the implementation of this directive under the auspices of a Critical Infrastructure Coordination Group (CICG), chaired by the National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection and Counter-Terrorism. The National Coordinator will be appointed by and report to...

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