Computers, Health Records, and Citizen Rights

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1976 - Medical records - 381 pages
 

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Page 20 - A physician may not reveal the confidences entrusted to him in the course of medical attendance, or the deficiencies he may observe in the character of patients, unless he is required to do so by law or unless it becomes necessary in order to protect the welfare of the individual or of the community.
Page 25 - Court pursuant to statutory authority, the privilege of a witness, person, government, State, or political subdivision thereof shall be governed by the principles of the common law as they may be interpreted by the courts of the United States in the light of reason and experience.
Page 33 - No person subject to this chapter may interrogate, or request any statement from an accused or a person suspected of an offense, without first informing him of the nature of the accusation and advising him that he does not have to make any statement regarding the offense of which he is accused or suspected and that any statement made by him may be used as evidence against him in a trial by court-martial.
Page 19 - Whatsoever things I see or hear concerning the life of men, in my attendance on the sick or even apart therefrom, which ought not to be noised abroad, I will keep silence thereon, counting such things to be as sacred secrets.
Page 378 - SECURITY CLASS (THIS REPORT) UNCLASSIFIED 20. SECURITY CLASS (THIS PAGE) UNCLASSIFIED 21. NO. OF PAGES 561 22.
Page 378 - Number 9. 13. Type of Report & Period Covered Final 14. Sponsoring Agency Code 15. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 74-5090 16.
Page 378 - Part one traces the changing patterns of employment and personnel administration in America from the 19th century to the present. Part...
Page 379 - Studies or reports which are complete in themselves but restrictive in their treatment of a subject. Analogous to monographs but not so comprehensive in scope or definitive in treatment of the subject area. Often serve as a vehicle for final reports of work performed at NBS under the sponsorship of other government agencies.