Concept de LibertŽ Au Canada Ë L'ƒpoque Des RŽvolutions Atlantiques (1776-1838)

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, 2010 - History - 350 pages
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Inspired by intellectual histories of the Atlantic world, Ducharme goes beyond the scholarly focus on Atlantic republicanism to present the rebellions of 1837-38 as a confrontation between two very different concepts of liberty. He uses these concepts as lenses through which to read colonial ideological conflict. Ducharme traces political discourse in both colonies, showing how the differing fates and influence of republican and constitutional notions of liberty affected state development. He also pursues a number of important revisionist historical claims, including the idea that nationalist politics were not at issue in the period and that "responsible government" was never a Patriote party platform or interest.
Taking a wider view allows Ducharme to provide a solid understanding of the ideological substance of political conflict and shows that, starting in 1791, Canadian colonial political culture revolved around an ideal of liberty that differed from the liberty at work within the revolutionary movements of the late eighteenth century but was nonetheless born of the Enlightenment.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
1 Liberté et Révolution dans le monde atlantique
17
2 La liberté dans la Province de Québec à lépoque des Révolutions américaine et française 17761805
46
3 La naissance des mouvements réformistes dans les Canadas 18051828
67
4 Nous le peuple ou La liberté républicaine dans les Canadas 18281838
117
5 La primauté des droits ou La liberté moderne dans les Canadas 18281838
162
les rébellions de 18371838
202
La liberté comme fondement de lÉtat au Canada
235
Notes
239
Bibliographie
301
Index
335
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Michel Ducharme is assistant professor in the Department of History at the University of British Columbia.

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