Concert Life in London from Mozart to Haydn

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 19, 1993 - Music - 300 pages
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During the second half of the eighteenth century, the pace of London's concert life quickened dramatically, reflecting both the prosperity and the commercial vitality of the capital. The most significant development was the establishment of the public concert within the social and cultural life of fashionable society. The subscription concerts that premiered symphonies by J. C. Bach and Haydn were conspicuous symbols of luxury, even though they were promoted on broadly commercial lines. Drawing on hitherto untapped archival sources and a comprehensive study of daily newspapers, this book analyses audiences at venues as diverse as the Hanover Square Rooms, Vauxhall Gardens and City taverns. The musical taste of the London public is investigated in the light of contemporary theories of aesthetics, and there is detailed discussion of the financial and practical aspects of concert management and performance, in a period that encouraged enterprise and innovation.
 

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Contents

Prologue
1
subscription and ancient concerts
11
Other types of concert
28
The concert in London life
53
novelty and familiarity
73
programming
101
Taste and national idioms
119
music intended to reach the heart
129
Concert management and the musician
165
Life as a professional musician
182
The practicalities of concert promotion
206
Epilogue
223
Notes
252
Musical sources
272
Index
287
Copyright

the learned the sublime and the dramatic
149

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