Conducting Research Surveys via E-mail and the Web

Front Cover
Rand Corporation, Feb 15, 2002 - Science - 142 pages
0 Reviews
Internet-based surveys, although still in their infancy, are becomingincreasingly popular because they are believed to be faster, better,cheaper, and easier to conduct than surveys using more-traditional telephoneor mail methods. Based on evidence in the literature and real-life casestudies, this book examines the validity of those claims. The authorsdiscuss the advantages and disadvantages of using e-mail and the Web toconduct research surveys, and also offer practical suggestions for designing and implementing Internet surveys most effectively.Among other findings, the authors determined that Internet surveys may bepreferable to mail or telephone surveys when a list of e-mail addresses forthe target population is available, thus eliminating the need for mail orphone invitations to potential respondents. Internet surveys also arewell-suited for larger survey efforts and for some target populations thatare difficult to reach by traditional survey methods. Web surveys areconducted more quickly than mail or phone surveys when respondents arecontacted initially by e-mail, as is often the case when a representativepanel of respondents has been assembled in advance. And, although surveysincur virtually no coding or data-entry costs because the data are capturedelectronically, the labor costs for design and programming can be high.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter One INTRODUCTION
1
Chapter Two BACKGROUND ON THE SURVEY PROCESS
5
Chapter Three LITERATURE REVIEW OF WEB AND EMAIL SURVEYS
19
Chapter Four CHOOSING AMONG THE VARIOUS TYPES OF INTERNET SURVEYS
33
Chapter Five GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNING AND IMPLEMENTING INTERNET SURVEYS
41
Chapter Six INTERNET SURVEY CASE STUDIES
55
Chapter Seven CONCLUSIONS
73
Appendix A LITERATURE REVIEW OF RESPONSE RATES
81
Appendix B SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE IN THE LITERATURE
95
Appendix C HOW EFFECTIVE IS USING A CONVENIENCE SAMPLE TO SUPPLEMENT A PROBABILITY SAMPLE?
107
REFERENCES
113
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Matthias Schonlau (Ph.D. Statistics, University of Waterloo, Ontario ) is an associate statistician at RAND.

Ron D. Fricker, Jr. (Doctor of Philosophy in Statistics, Yale University) is a researcher at RAND interested in statistical process control, quality control, military manpower and logistics, and warfare modeling.

Marc N. Elliott (Ph.D., Statistics, 1995, Rice University, Houston, TX) is an Associate Statistician at RAND.

Bibliographic information